Adrian Barrett examines the low popularity of the MBA degree among Indian women as compared to their

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Adrian Barrett examines the low popularity of the MBA degree among Indian women as compared to their peers overseas. *Read More*
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I think the mindset of Indian women is the biggest hurdle.... 'Coz they are "Programmed" that way by their parents right from childhood

I received following response regarding this topic from few female colleagues:
  1. The economically well-to-do Indian women often are at equals with male counterparts when going for MBA abroad - If they choose not to do MBA, it is their personal choice to go for "alternative" courses like fashion industry, interior designs...
  2. The economically not-so-well Indian women still are having a "traditional" mindset. They want to get married, after which, most of them lose the drive to study. In fact, a lot of them quit jobs and stay homemakers.
  3. Even if such women continue their job, they want a "typical" 9-to-5 job and have very less intentions to grow ahead in jobs.
A colleague of mine is also quitting her career for becoming a "Full-time" homemaker. I tried in vain to convince her. She has the potential to do wonderfully well in Management career but she has decided to quit her career....:neutral:.

But thankfully, things are changing for better... People are thinking ahead... Hopefully, females/their parents will change their mindsets sooner....


I so totally totally agree with you!!!!
There's one point you missed out, though... .. the ones who REALLY try to pursue their careers are called crazy.

I'm 28, and have been married for 2 years. When I voiced my intention of giving the GMAT, I was called totally crazy. My Dad and Bro supported me, and I (figuratively) held a gun to hubby's head to get him to agree.
My In-Laws have all dubbed me 'Crazy as Hell'

I'm like..." Yeah?? OK :-)"

I got a good score (hit the 99%ile with 770), but a lot of people (incl my FIL) call my attempt at the GMAT 'Koi MBA ka course' which of course shouldn't be given much weightage at all.

The only factors that keep me going are my father, my Bro and those dreams in my eyes... which I stubbornly refuse to give up.

But it's a hard road for sure. I'm sorry if I sound sexist, but you guys have no idea how easy you've got it...

Yo to woman power
Keya
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I think the mindset of Indian women is the biggest hurdle.... 'Coz they are "Programmed" that way by their parents right from childhood

I received following response regarding this topic from few female colleagues:

  1. The economically well-to-do Indian women often are at equals with male counterparts when going for MBA abroad - If they choose not to do MBA, it is their personal choice to go for "alternative" courses like fashion industry, interior designs...
  2. The economically not-so-well Indian women still are having a "traditional" mindset. They want to get married, after which, most of them lose the drive to study. In fact, a lot of them quit jobs and stay homemakers.
  3. Even if such women continue their job, they want a "typical" 9-to-5 job and have very less intentions to grow ahead in jobs.
A colleague of mine is also quitting her career for becoming a "Full-time" homemaker. I tried in vain to convince her. She has the potential to do wonderfully well in Management career but she has decided to quit her career....:neutral:.

But thankfully, things are changing for better... People are thinking ahead... Hopefully, females/their parents will change their mindsets sooner....
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Adrian Barrett examines the low popularity of the MBA degree among Indian women as compared to their peers overseas.

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