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Watch free movies online at Go Movies https://www.gomoviesuk.com/ 

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Does any one of you can provide the link for downloading lakshya movie in hindi? I have official laptop So I cannot install torrentz. So give me some link which has good print and do not require any installation of file?

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Movie:  Dawn of the Planet of the Apes

Director: Matt Reeves

Cast: Jason Clarke, Gary Oldman, Keri Russell, Andy Serkis

Rating: ****1/2

“Godzilla” did it few weeks ago, changed the perspective of a summer blockbuster. It reminded us that a summer attraction need not be always be about mass destruction, mayhem and full throttle action, and that it could also be a film with intelligence, great visual effects and an emotional core that you find in Matt Reeves's “Dawn of the Planet of the Apes”, which effortlessly rewriters blockbuster movie formulas. You need to watch it to believe it, to realize how realistic the film is, the apes are vis-à-vis the humans who don't stand a chance against their simian counterparts.

Trust and co-existence – it's on these two words Reeves has made the film, which gives us the glimpse of the human as well as evil side in the apes. It's on the basis of trust Caesar allows humans to work in his colony, Koba to be his commander, and expects his son to follow in his footsteps. But when this trust gets broken, it's the relationship between all of them that's deeply affected, almost obliterating the chance of coexisting (humans and apes).

It's a story about peacemaking and co-existing, but the peace is short-lived, broken by a few who are keen on going to war. The war is supposed to be between apes versus humans, but it's actually within the apes and humans for survival and ownership. Caesar is at war with Koba (who betrays his own kind), while Malcolm is fighting against the surviving human race lead by Dreyfus (Oldman), who wants to kill the apes as he feels they are responsible for spreading the virus (but it was scientists from the first part who were responsible for it).

When two sides are at war, you tend to pick one, quite naturally. But Reeves ensures you don't pick a side (but you are connected with both sides on an emotional level) and instead makes you root for characters like Caesar, Malcolm, Maurice and Rocket, who believe in peace and co-existence and therefore will go any extent to protect it. This is precisely why Maurice and Rocket don't join forces with Koba (who leads the apes out of fear to a war against the humans), but later on reunite with Caesar to stand up against him. They believe in Caesar, trust his leadership, and he trusts their loyalty.

Reeves is just as skillful at directing the small, quiet moments between apes and humans as he is with the film's action scenes. In a standout scene, Alexander (Malcolm's son) sits down with an ape to read Charles Burn's graphic novel Black Hole, a nice touch to anyone familiar with that story of a mysterious disease. In another scene, both Malcolm and Caesar realize all that they both want is to protect their families and peacefully co-exist without crossing each other's paths. Instead of focusing on full-blown action, this sequel to “Rise of the Planet of the Apes”, concentrates on strengthening relationships, uncovering the humane side of the apes and sets the stage for what appears to be a better third part in the franchise.

Thanks to the life-like CGI, apes are unbelievably realistic; their eyes so beautiful, expressive and faces reflect myriad expressions flawlessly. Serkis provides some gravitas with his performance as Caesar, the ape leader. It's probably the first time you will find yourself rooting for an ape with high intellect and speaking ability. From the first time he uttered the 'No' word in the last part to the scene in the sequel, where he manages to communicate with Malcolm for the first time, Caesar has graciously aged. He now has a family – wife and two sons. He commands respect, not just from his own kind, from audiences as well, and you give him that wholeheartedly.

The apes are among the more intellectually complex characters you're likely to spend time with this summer. A lot of care and imagination have been spent on the creation of their world and it deserves to be widely appreciated.

More reviews at www.movieroundup.in


Haricharan is an independent film critic who writes at http://movieroundup.in/ and tweets at http://@pudiharicharan
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The Grand Budapest Hotel is the latest offering from the American filmmaker Wes Anderson. Inspired by the writings of the 20th century Austrian novelist and playwright Stefan Zweig, The Grand Budapest Hotel premiered at the 64th Berlin International Film Festival, back in February 2014, where it won the Grand Jury Prize—the festival's second most prestigious prize. While The Grand Budapest Hotel stars renowned English actor Ralph Fiennes in the lead role, it's star-studded ensemble cast—mostly consisting of Anderson regulars—also includes the likes of F. Murray Abraham, Edward Norton, Jude Law, Adrien Brody, Willem Dafoe, Tilda Swinton, Harvey Keitel, Tom Wilkinson, Bill Murray, Léa Seydoux, Mathieu Amalric and Owen Wilson. A unique blend of comedy, satire, and magic-realism, The Grand Budapest Hotel, as a work of cinematic art, cannot be deemed original in its totality, for it borrows heavily from such luminaries as Ernst Lubitsch, Jacques Tati, Alfred Hitchcock, and Stanley Kubrick, but, in its essence, it's much more than a pastiche of sorts; vintage Wes Anderson's creative genius.

While The Grand Budapest Hotel is a celebration of the little moments of joy in each of our lives, behind the façade of levity, it is a also warning and a reminder to the society at large that our world is at a constant danger from being taken over by the dark forces and that complacency and indifference are the things that we can least afford. But, first and foremost, it's a tale of solitude and how human beings learn to cope up with it. The movie's seemingly bizarre plot, one that's generally associated with B-grade horror comedies, revolves around M. Gustave, the fastidious concierge of the Grand Budapest (a remote, mountainside hotel situated in the fictional Republic of Zubrowka on the farthest eastern boundary of Europe), and the devoted young lobby boy Zero Moustafa. Anderson's playful film takes us back in time, ever so subtly, bringing us face-to-face with one of the darkest phases in modern history, the early 1930s, mocking and mourning the period that marked the beginning of the Holocaust in Europe.

Through The Grand Budapest Hotel, Wes Anderson serves us with a piquant cocktail fizzing with the resplendence of the extremes: the sublime and the absurd, the dignified and the frivolous, the brutal and the tender, the worldly and the spiritual, and the ghastly and the pleasant. In M. Gustave, we get to see a man of dignity, honor and humility who is an expert in matters of propriety concerning the hospitality profession. He is fully committed to entertaining the needs of the hotel's distinguished clientele as well as managing its staff. But, beneath his calm and composed patina underlies a reservoir of nervous energy that's probably a result of his abject solitude which he tries to mitigate by finding solace in the company of the aging, affluent blonde women who frequently visit The Grand Budapest just to enjoy his amorous friendship. It's as if by serving as a gigolo to these insecure, superficial, vain women, he has found a temporary cure to his own ancient ailment.

Ralph Fiennes plays the part of M. Gustave with scalpel-like precision, delicately embracing the nuances and subtleties of the complex caricature. In the view of this critic, Fiennes' heart-wrenching performance in The Grand Budapest Hotel is second only to his tour de force portrayal of Amon Goeth in Steven Spielberg's Schindler's List (1993). In addition, a vast panoply of interesting characters is on display here: committed lovers, cold-blooded murders, adulterous dames, fiendish sons, devoted servants, honorable criminals, gregarious writers, unassuming attorneys, martinet proprietors, stoic immigrants, and more. While the acting is brilliant all around, Willem Dafoe, Adrien Brody, F. Murray Abraham, Tilda Swinton, Harvey Keitel are delightful to watch in their short but memorable roles. Another actor that deserves a special mention is the newcomer Tony Revolori impresses as young Zero Moustafa. Like any other Wes Anderson film, The Grand Budapest Hotel brilliantly balances the technical and the emotional elements. Robert Yeoman's brilliant cinematography (reminiscent of Stanley Kubrick's films) is well complemented by Alexandre Desplat's uplifting background score. The movie's pacing is brilliant thanks to Barney Pilling's topnotch editing. Visually, the movie is nothing short of a spectacle.

Overall, The Grand Budapest Hotel is an important work of cinematic art that offers entertainment and food for thought in equal parts. As a powerful treatise on solitude and nihilism, the movie harks back to the motifs explored by Gabriel García Márquez in One Hundred Years a Solitude and Love in Time of Cholera. The Grand Budapest Hotel's story-within-a-story narrative seems to work quite well and gives the movie the feel of a grandiose dream. The movie in itself may be nothing more than an illusion but it directs us towards a poignant reality that is impossible to avoid or overlook. The Grand Budapest Hotel has its share of incongruities and anachronisms but that doesn't prevent the movie from weaving its magic on the viewers. These inconsistencies are a result of Wes Anderson's artistic freedom, and, if anything, they only add to the movie's overall appeal. This brings us to the all-important question: Is “The Grand Budapest Hotel” Wes Anderson's best film till date? Well, perhaps, yes… but, frankly speaking, that's for the time to decide. For the time being, it will be safe to say that it's definitely his most accessible film yet. Wes Anderson fans would obviously devour this gem without having any second thoughts. For the uninitiated, it's a great means to get acquainted with his oeuvre; once through, they can work backwards from there on. In the end, it would be safe to say that those who admire and appreciate topnotch international cinema wouldn't be left untouched by the charm of The Grand Budapest Hotel.


Note: This article was originally published here

Murtaza Ali is a film critic and a movie enthusiast based out of Delhi. He blogs at http://www.apotpourriofvestiges.com/ and tweets at https://twitter.com/apotofvestiges
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murtaza.jmi
@murtaza.jmi  ·  0 karma

Let me assure you that it's not done on purpose... probably it has something to do with the subconscious. Actually, I had reviewed "The Nymphomaniac" here on Pagalguy Channels and an ardent reader had questioned the relevance of reviewing such a "bold" film on an MBA forum. So, probably, unbeknownst to my conscious self, a part of me must have wanted to write a review which would actually benefit the MBA aspirants. If my understanding is correct, these "Thesaurus" words can actually be leveraged upon for CAT/GMAT preparation!!! 😃

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Avishek91
@Avishek91  ·  0 karma

Good to see you here! Keep them coming. Gotta catch this and The Nymphomaniac soon. 😃
-- Fellow 'Cinephile'. 😛

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Cast - Tom Cruise, Emily Blunt

Directed by - Doug Liman

Music by - Christophe Beck

Studio - Warner Bros

Rating - 4/5

Aliens, End of the world, Warships, Endless array of guns and bullets - A typical Sci-Fi movie with aliens has all these aspects. Edge of Tomorrow has loads of these. But what makes it unique and enjoyable is it's unique story-line and a cleverly crafted screenplay. Coming to the cast, nobody does it better than Tom Cruise. Emily Blunt has an equally powerful characterization and adds a loads of value to the action.

The Story is set at a time when an alien race had invaded the earth and have taken over Western Europe. The aliens are called as 'mimics' because of their ability to acclimatize themselves to human combat and retaliate back. Humans finally achieve success by developing specialized battle suits to counter the mimics. Using these Special Soldier Rita Vrataski (Emily Brunt) achieves success at the Battle of Verdun.Humans plan for a final assault on the aliens at the beaches of France. As success is expected, the Americans send in Major William Cage(Tom Cruise) to the scene. Cage who has no experience in combat gets to be part of the J-squad and enters into the assault. As expected he struggles and gets killed by the blood of an alien called 'Alpha'. Now the aliens aim to take over Earth by their ability to reverse time. Since they could reverse time they know the tricks and strategies of humans and be prepared to handle all those. Since Cage comes in contact with Alpha's blood he gets the ability to reverse time and resurrects every time he gets killed. As with every death, he learns the tricks of the aliens. He meets Rita and gets to know that she too has the same power. Joined by Dr.Carter (Noah Taylor), they learn that the power source of the alien race called as 'Omega' has the ability to shift and reverse time and Omega needs to be destroyed for the war to be won. How they devise their plan to find and conquer over Omega forms the central plot of the story.

Doug Limon has presented a fantastic Sci-fi thriller. The story is well connected and well presented. The audience get imbibed in the well scripted story plot. Several lighter moments arise when William Cage dies and reverses time and returns to his previous state. The dialogues are witty and sometimes humorous. Christophe Beck has presented a very decent background score. Be it countering lot of mimics, dropping off from the jets,firing a volley of bullets, the background score keeps you entertained. The cast of this movie is short and sweet. You have barely 10 characters. Tom Cruise, as always has done complete justice as William Cage. He fits in perfectly at a couple of scenes. His evolution from being unwillingly thrown to the battle field to becoming combat ready to wipe off the mimics is awesome. Emily Blunt performs a Lara Croft. Be it devising combat strategies, throwing of grenades, massacring the mimics she performs an amazing role. Also from the crew, it was known that both Tom Cruise and Emily took up rigorous training for 3 months. They practiced everything from gymnastics to yoga. You could also spot two characters from the Game of Thrones. They are Noah Tyler and Tony Way.

To conclude, Edge of Tomorrow is an awesome Sci-Fi thriller with a witty screenplay. Do watch it for the Storyline !



PGP 2014-16, Indian Institute of Management Bangalore
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jibincjoseph
@jibincjoseph  ·  1 karma

Its the sci-fi version of 'groundhogs day' 😛

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vipul619
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Isn't it a weaponized version of Source Code?

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I must admit that I am not into movies that are about unreal characters and fairy tales but the moment I saw Maleficent's trailer I was absolutely sure that I have to watch this one. And I am glad I did that because the movie is no less than splendid.

Maleficent is a dark fantasy adventure film directed by Robert Stromberg and screenplay by Linda Woolverton. Woolverton is best known for her work in Alice in Wonderland, The Lion King and Beauty and the Beast. Maleficent is from the house of Disney which had created Sleeping Beauty in 1959 and Maleficent is the story told from the antagonist's point of view. Maleficent stars Angelina Jolie as the quint-essential villainous (not really) character known as Maleficent, Elle Fanning, Sharlto Copley and Sam Riley in lead roles.

Maleficent (Angelina Jolie) is the most beautiful and strongest faire in the world and her home is The Moors which is a magical realm that borders a human kingdom. The Moors is no place for humans because humans pose a threat behind the possible extinction of the habitants of The Moors. Maleficent falls in love with a boy named Stefan (Sharlto Copley) and she believes it to be true love, but then is there no such thing called true love. The king from the kingdom strikes an attack on The Moors but Maleficent with her army defeats them hands down. However, with the blindness of the ambition to become the king, Stefan betrays Maleficent and steals her wings which were her power, her life. Maleficent is no weak woman and takes it upon her to seal the fate of Stefan, the new king. Maleficent finds Diaval (Sam Riley) in the form of a crow fighting for his life. She saves him and he offers to become her loyal servant for life and that's how Diaval becomes Maleficent's wings, eyes and ears. Stefan and his queen is blessed with a baby girl, Princess Aurora (Elle Fanning). Maleficent arrives in her dramatic way to curse Aurora that she would be stung by a needle from a sewing machine on her sixteenth birthday and only true love's kiss could awaken her to life from the sleep of death. King Stefan knows the power of Maleficent's curse and hence bestows the tasks on three feeble and trivial faire to keep Aurora away from the kingdom until her sixteenth birthday and simultaneously gets all sewing machines burnt down. As fate would have it, Aurora's sixteenth birthday arrives and there's a whole lot of adventure around the same.

The movie seemed like a complete package to me with faire, minions, tree creatures, dwarfs, dragons giving the audience the substantial rush of adrenaline every now and then. The sets are stellar with such great level of attention given to even minuscule details and the costumes do perfect justice to the grandness of the characters and the story itself. Maleficent roams around in a larger than life black dress that flows for a few feet behind her as she walks. Aurora's princess like dresses that had to be modest courtesy her exile from the kingdom are beautiful and fairy like herself.

The special effects are worth an applause but I quite didn't see the point of 3D here. Agreed, it's a visual spectacle but then if a movie is for 3D the makers must infuse the sequences which reflect the effect in its true nature. I wish they had focused a bit more on this aspect. At the same time, I will have to give it to the makers for ensuring that the movie is full of drama and ensuring that the drama is believable and real.

What stole my heart was Angelina's magnetic performance as Maleficent. Jolie is such a brilliant actor and that reflects in Maleficent in which she lets her eyes do the work, the talk and the action. She definitely leveraged the beauty of her eyes to the best. Jolie also reflected sincerity in her portrayal of such a complex character who is a bundle of love and yet full of vengeance and overpowered with the emotions of revenge. Her dialogue delivery was impeccable for sure.

Elle Fanning who played Princess Aurora is magical. She was fun, honest, beautiful, playful and just to her character. I personally thought that hers was a job well done with the requisite level of emotions reflected in the requisite quantity. She certainly brought life to her character and to the movie itself.

Shartlo Copley and Sam Riley were well suited for their roles as King Stefan and Diaval. They delivered good performances and certainly added value to the talent of other actors.

My recommendation - this movie is for the masses, kids and adults alike. Go and have fun watching a visual spectacle that is spectacular in a lot of ways. I give 3.5 teaspoon of masala to fairy tale that should be heard and seen.

Read my other reviews here http://masalaartadda.wordpress.com/


Rule Wisely, Rule Fabulously!
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I admit that this is a delayed review but nevertheless I had to write it down courtesy the brilliance that I saw in the performances, direction and story in Citylights.

Citylights is based on Metro Manila which is a 2013 British-Filipino independently produced crime drama film directed by Sean Ellis. Metro Manila was selected as the British entry for the Best Foreign Language Film at the 86th Academy Awards but was not nominated. What I loved is the fact that makers of Citylights gave due credit to Metro Manila which a lot of filmmakers, who adapt other movies, fail to do intentionally and/or unintentionally.

Directed by Hansal Mehta who is known for directing Shahid that got him a National Award for Best Direction, Citylights delivers on the promise that the award has bestowed on him. I simply loved the casting. I adore Rajkumar Rao and with each film of his, my respect for the actor enhances manifold. No wonder Mehta went with his decision to cast Rao yet again after Shahid, after all Rao was also honoured with the National Award for Best Actor. Rao is best complimented with a phenomenal co-actor in the form of Patralekha who plays Rao's wife in the movie. After watching Citylights, I couldn't believe that this is Patralekha's first movie, you have a long way to go girl! And wow, what a splendid show by Manav Kaul as Vishnu.

Citylights is the story of Deepak Singh (Rajkumar Rao) and his wife, Rakhi (Patralekha) whose lives have turned upside down after Deepak's cloth shop in a village in Rajasthan is shut down courtesy non-payment of a loan taken by him. With no other possible source of income and with high hopes of a better life in Mumbai, Deepak travels miles with his wife and their daughter to come to the city of hope. Mumbai of course had different plans for them and life gets from bad to worse in just hours of them reaching the city. They are duped and life's almost over for them. As fate would have it, Rakhi ends up working as a bar dancer and Deepak finds employment with a security agency which is introduced to him by Vishnu (Manav Kaul). Deepak and Vishnu work as partners and they are required to collect boxes and deliver it to clients. They never have the keys to the boxes and are required to risk their lives for safe delivery of these boxes. With the turn of events, Deepak lands in a terrible situation which could either uplift Deepak and his family's life or could completely doom them. You have to see the movie to figure out what happens next!

If I were to talk about the negatives of the film, there's just one and that is the pace of the film. It sometimes gets too slow but then you realize that the slow pace was somehow requisite for the upcoming event in the movie. However, the brilliant, flawless and terrific performances make up for the pace thousand times. A standing ovation to Hansal Mehta for getting genuine and heartbreaking performances by everyone and especially Patralekha.

A special mention for Rao and Patralekha for the perfect diction of the Rajasthani language. It was without doubt the best accent and diction portrayal ever.

There's a scene in the movie when Rakhi slaps Deepak and brings Deepak to the world of reality. I was appalled and in awe of this actress who delivered that scene with absolute honesty, sincerity and panache.

Only an out-of-this-world direction could ensure that a simple yet complex movie like Citylights tells the story as is and leaves no room for adulteration. Mehta has proved himself yet again.

Music is simply soulful and lavishly rich. The song 'Muskurane' is so beautiful that you won't stop singing it over and over again. The background music connects to the story and the respective scene like a dream come true.

My recommendation - go and watch Citylights for honest performances, brilliant story and plot, and flawless direction. I give 3.5 teaspoon of masala to this heart breaking tale of life, relationships, struggle and survival.

Read my other reviews here http://masalaartadda.wordpress.com/

Rule Wisely, Rule Fabulously!
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achalgulati
@achalgulati  ·  0 karma

U must hav liked shahid of shahid

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sushant1002001
@sushant1002001  ·  0 karma

Naah.....even that movie after the first 40 min was zzzzzzzzzzz.

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Movie: Citylights

Director: Hansal Mehta

Cast: Rajkummar Rao, Patralekha, Manav Kaul

Rating: **1/2

Basking in the glory of the recent National award win, filmmaker Hansal Mehta's “Citylights”, official remake of Filipino film “Metro Manila”, is a movie that's powered by extremely honest and realistic performances but let down by dull content. For all those who haven't watched the original, the remake might come across as a heart-rending tale of a family's struggle to survive in Mumbai. And for those who have watched the original, “Citylights” is a mediocre retelling of a tragic story that gets squandered by the Bhatts brand of high melodrama and extremely jarring and loud music, but for the opening track, which echoes over and over again throughout the film

The story remains the same. A man (Rajkummar) with his family from a small village in Rajasthan lands in Mumbai to work. But Mumbai treats him very badly, and after initial setbacks he finally lands a job in an armoured truck company. There, he meets Manav, who plays his boss-cum-partner, who forces him to get lost in the maze of money.

If Metro Manila was all about subtlety and minimum melodrama, its remake is exactly the opposite. In both the films, the lead characters plagued by poverty are struggling in a crime-riddled city, but that shouldn't make one story more tragic than the other because they're remakes. Citylights portrays poverty how Bollywood has been doing it for decades. Bollywood's version of poverty states that a poor family in Bombay should cry as much as possible because they're less privileged. Sean Ellis portrays poverty in the original with care and avoids high melodrama. In one of the best scenes from Metro Manila, the wife is weeping thinking about the mess they're in leaning on her husband's chest, but she quickly wipes her tears clean and says 'someday…we will get out of this mess'. Isn't that reassuring for a film that's already so tragic? Citylights achieves the exact opposite and makes the story less inspiring.

Mehta makes this weak adaptation barely watchable with his realism, but it's the Bhatts who make it a rather disappointing film with music and melodrama. The opening song is soothing and registers in mind instantly, but it is played so many times in the film at different instances, you start to hate it to the core. The ear-shattering background score is so loud that sometimes dialogues get extremely hard to follow in the film, which required movingly emotional tune to sync into the mood of the narrative. The film would've worked wonderfully even without songs.

Rajkummar stuns everybody with a solid performance as the hapless husband, while newcomer Patralekha, who plays his wife, is a great find and is sure going to leave her mark in the industry inundated with so many actresses. Rao's transformation from the village-dweller to the gun-trotting security guard in the climax is excellent and will stay with you even after you leave the cinema hall. It's a rare emotional scene which is actually not so melodramatic in the film. Manav Kaul as the conniving boss steals the limelight right from under Rajkummar's nose. The sincerity with which the actors play their respective roles is proof to the director's ability to extract the best out of his actors. If only Hansal didn't let the Bhatts intervene in his style of filmmaking, Citylights would've been a much better film, if not outstanding.

The best part of the film is that the makers gave due credit to the original by mentioning it half a dozen times in the titles. That's a welcome change in Bollywood.

Read more reviews here


Haricharan is an independent film critic who writes at http://movieroundup.in/ and tweets at http://@pudiharicharan
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MovieRoundup
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Thanks @Sunil1989 It could have been a better film. The Bhatts made it very melodramatic. Nevertheless, watchable for the performances of the lead actors. Read more reviews at www.movieroundup.in

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Anne44304
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trust the Bhatts to ruin something beautiful!!!

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Gay! Homosexuals! It's sad to say but even in 2014 these terms are sort of taboo and life is hardly any better for this major (note, no more minor) community. Imagine what it would have been like in the 20th century. The Normal Heart is about that and especially about an unknown virus that was claiming the life of hundreds of homosexuals across the globe back in 1970s and 80s. And the virus, as we know it today, is AIDS.

The Normal Heart is a soul stirring, emotionally packed, thought rupturing true story of a strongly knit gay community from 1970s/80s and about the ultimate fight for rights, equality, justice, and survival which eventually led to a movement of such a large scale that US Government officially proclaimed the life threatening virus as 'AIDS' and funded the research for same.

Directed by widely applauded and acclaimed, Emmy winning director Ryan Murphy who is also the creator of Fox musical comedy-drama Glee, The Normal Heart stars Mark Ruffalo, Matt Boomer, Julia Roberts, Jim Parsons, Taylor Kitsch, Joe Mantello, and Jonathan Groff. The movie is based on a play by the same name written by Larry Kramer in 1985.

Ned Weeks (Mark Ruffalo) is a senior member of a gay community and a highly active and energetic gay rights activist. Ned, on a weekend getaway to Fair Islands to celebrate his friend, Craig's (Jonathan Groff) birthday realizes that something's not right with otherwise seemingly Craig's good health. When Ned returns to NYC, he happens to read an article named 'Rare cancer diagnosed in 41 homosexuals'. He doesn't waste a minute and meets Dr. Emma Brookner (Julia Roberts) who is a strong willed physician; paralyzed courtesy polio. Emma has been seeing patients (gay patients rather) whose immunity system has given up and they are afflicted with symptoms of rare diseases that would otherwise not harm people with normal health. While Ned is seeking Emma's support in spreading awareness of the rare disease among gay people, Bruce (Taylor Kitsch) rushes into the hospital with Craig and ultimately Craig dies.

Then starts the movement led by Ned and joined by Bruce as President, Tommy (Jim Parsons), Mickey (Joe Mantello) and several other gay rights activists. During the course of time, Ned falls madly in love with Felix Turner (Matt Bomer) who is a journalist at The New York Times. The Normal Heart is about the quest for acceptance of gay men in the society, frustration of thousands of closeted gay men, battle for acceptance of the virus and seeking genuine support and funding from the government, and lastly about depth of love, care and loss between Ned and Felix.

What can I say about the performances! Each and every actor out here has lived beyond the expectations and delivered performances worth awards galore. The actor who amazed me the most is Mark Ruffalo who has played the role of Ned Weeks with absolute determination, panache and belief which reflects in every emotion, every frame and every dialogue. Mark understood that Ned is someone who is angry at everyone and with everything which doesn't want to fight for equality and rights. He knows that Ned is frustrated, mad, blunt, outspoken, passionate and above all a gem at heart. I personally would like to give Mark a standing ovation for such a true, leal and sincere performance of a gay man when he is no gay in real life.

Roberts continues to amaze me every time. She is so believable as the polio struck self-determined doctor who wants to fight for others. One of my most favorite scene in the movie is when she is addressing a small gathering (rather a gathering of barely 8 people) which has a representative from the city Mayor and; her anger, her frustration, her helplessness, her years of hard work and research is showcased in a manner which reiterates a belief that Roberts is an actor beyond appreciation through just words.

Matt Bomer has won me. I used to be his fan courtesy White Collar but now I am a follower of his acting talent and his willingness to go the extra mile for playing the role of Felix. Bomer had to lose 40lbs to come across as a genuinely AIDS diagnosed patient and he admits that by the end of filming he was actually so terribly weak that he needed assistance to be carried to the scene from his bed on the set.

Jim Parsons and Joe Mantello are icing on the cake in the form of sincere and zealous performances. Parsons is so earnest as Tommy that you will forget him as Dr. Sheldon Cooper. Mantello is an incredible actor and a stamp of approval on the same is a scene (longest scene in terms of duration) in the movie and the scene is a slap on all those who term being gay as a disease, who loathe gays, and probably want every gay person to turn straight.

The Normal Heart is full of scenes that will make you cry, make you empathize with people (especially gay people) and the movie has the potential to make people look at gays as normal beings who find nothing wrong with loving HIM and not a her (and likewise for lesbians).

It's sad that this movie probably won't get a release in India. But I would earnestly ask everyone and especially every straight person to watch this.

My recommendation - there are movies that shouldn't be missed at any cost and The Normal Heart is one such movie. It could make you believe in the existence of gay people a bit more and could eventually make you empathize with them. Mind you, never ever sympathize them. I give 4.5 teaspoon of masala to this heart breaking tale of love and the identification of AIDS.

Read my other reviews here http://masalaartadda.wordpress.com/

Rule Wisely, Rule Fabulously!
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vijayant141187
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@MovieRoundup will wait for your comments 😃
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MovieRoundup
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Definitely. As soon as i watch it

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X-Men: Days of Future Past, directed by American filmmaker Bryan Singer, is the seventh and the latest film in the X-Men movie franchise. Created by writer Stan Lee and artist Jack Kirby, the X-Men are an eponymous group of mutant superheroes which got inducted into the Marvel Universe back in the early '60s with the launch of the comic book series, "The X-Men” aka “Uncanny X-Men”. Under the able tutelage and protection of Professor Charles Xavier—a powerful psychic and a fellow mutant—the X-Men learn to hone their special powers with the purpose of serving mankind and to prove mutants can be heroes as oppose to freaks of nature who are a major threat to humanity as their detractors like to call them. Xavier calls them "X-Men" because their special abilities are a result of the "X-gene"—a gene that's absent in normal humans. X-Men: Days of Future Past stellar ensemble cast includes the likes of Hugh Jackman, Michael Fassbender, Jennifer Lawrence, James McAvoy, Ellen Page, Ian McKellen and Patrick Stewart. X-Men: Days of Future Past features cameos from Halle Berry, Famke Janssen, and James Marsden.

X-Men: Days of Future Past is set in the not too distant future, circa early 2020s, when the mutant race is facing extinction at the hands of mutant-exterminating robots called Sentinels. Professor Charles Xavier, who has returned from the dead, has joined hands with his arch-nemesis, Magneto, in bid to save the last of their race from obliteration. Xavier and Magneto decide to send Wolverine 50 years into the past, wherein he must reunite with the Xavier and Magneto of old and together they must prevent an event from occurring and thus alter the course of history, with the help of Kitty Pryde (Ellen Page)—a young mutant gifted with the ability to project a person's consciousness back in time. But, Wolverine has his job cut out, for not only does it turn out to be a race against time but also a clash of egos as he tries his level best to bring the spiteful and disillusioned Xavier (remember, this takes a few years after the events of X-Men: First Class wherein Xavier was left crippled by his one-time friend Erik aka Magneto) and the ever so fiendish Magneto on the same page by trying to convince them about the macabre future that awaited the mutant race.

Out of the six “X-Men” films that have come out prior to X-Men: Days of Future Past, the two films that impressed this critic the least are The Wolverine (2013) and X-Men Origins: Wolverine (2009), and in that order. This clearly is not an aberration. The best way to understand this is to realize that the X-Men franchise, unlike some of the other superhero franchises, has never been about one or two characters. As popular as he may be in the X-Men universe, Wolverine is just one of the many superstars in the X-Men horizon who without the bunch of others just doesn't have the same appeal. There are a Jennifer Lawrence as Mystique aka Raven, X-Men: Days of Future Past, Directed by Bryan Singer Jennifer Lawrence as Mystique aka Raven lot many superhero franchises out there but what makes X-Men stand out is its wide array of characters, for visual splendor is a given with all these Hollywood productions. The late American film critic, Roger Ebert, in his review of Star Trek II: “Star Trek stories have always been best when they centered around their characters.” Well, the same can be said of X-Men stories. The film franchise viewers are obviously excited to see the special effects but what they are really interested in is their beloved characters. This critic, for one, is thrilled by the very rivalry that drives the relationship that Professor Charles Xavier shares with Magneto. They may oppose each other on the basis of principles but there is deep mutual respect that lies underneath. They detest each other's ways but deep down they know that each of them is doing the best they could for the survival of their race.

Overall, X-Men: Days of Future Past serves as a heavy dose of entertainment that may not necessarily be devoid of substance. As a matter of fact, it's the perfect summer blockbuster that the audiences all around the globe crave for. Bryan Singer and team need to be commended for striking the right balance between the move's technical and emotional elements which ultimately enabled them to put up a fabulous show (the movie's sequences that are set in the '70s are absolutely spellbinding). While the acting is superb all around, the cinematography and editing are topnotch. The role of the youthful Magneto, debonair, arrogant and unforgiving, in X-Men: First Class (2011) seemed to have provided Fassbender with the right conduit to showcase his acting capabilities to the whole world and since then he has never looked back. In X-Men: Days of Future Past, he delivers yet another memorable performance. James McAvoy is another actor who has continued to impress this critic in recent times. His acting career got revived with X-Men: First Class and he has followed up the good work in films like Trance (2013), Filth (2013), and The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby (2013). And, X-Men: Days of Future Past is no exception. Hugh Jackman is solid as ever—albeit a bit subdued—in the role that has made him an international phenomenon. Jennifer Lawrence is slowly emerging as the definitive female action icon of our times. It's good to see her character get more screen time this time around. The support cast is well led by the veterans like Ian McKellen and Patrick Stewart. In the end, X-Men: Days of Future Past is a film that will thrill and excite the viewers of all ages and groups.

Note: This review was originally published here

Murtaza Ali is a film critic and a movie enthusiast based out of Delhi. He blogs at http://www.apotpourriofvestiges.com/ and tweets at https://twitter.com/apotofvestiges
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Sunil1989
@Sunil1989  ·  0 karma

Ya it was too good basically the story line

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