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Hi guys,

selling CL MBA online classes comprehensive plus worth Rs 50000 in 25000. Interested please comment or message

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CAT total of 28 books up for grabs in new condition from Mumbai Andheri East. DM for more details.

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 I have brand new unwrapped 2018 Official Guide GMAT book, with Quantitiative and Verbal Review. Along with that I am giving Princeton Review GMAT, Verbal & Quant Review books. A total of 6 books with online access and free GMAT tests 


Original price- 

1600 OG GMAT

850 OG Verbal Review

850 OG Quant. Review

1500 Pack of 3 The Princeton Review: Verbal, Quant, GMAT Manual

Total: 4800 INR Market Value


I am leaving mumbai in 10 days. Books to be collected from Andheri East. Also if you need CAT materials- I have CAT all books, Leaflets and guidebooks, along with an exclusive Post CAT guidebook to crack GD, Interview, and SOPs! Please email on simransoni.cbs@gmail.com


First come first serve basis.

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https://photos.app.goo.gl/Buqof597934u4PKy6 TARGET CAT 2019 Here are some details of my CAT VARC Book that will interest you:


1. How to use this book

2. Table of contents



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 TARGET 2019

 

Those who are targetting CAT 2019, you may follow the threads: 


1. CAT 2019 Preparation Group, 

2. CAT 2019 Preparation PaGalGuy 


For CAT VARC preparation, there are two regular daily offerings:

 

1. ONE QUESTION A DAY--START NOW

2. ANALYZE YOUR CAT 2018 VARC ANSWERS

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Hi everyone! I need TIME material for CAT. If anyone wishes to give or sell, please ping.

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Viveknalwa
@Viveknalwa  ·  0 karma

if still looking, i have materials, just let me know

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ANALYZE YOUR CAT 2018 VARC ANSWERS--WHY YOU WENT WRONG 

CAT 2018 SLOT 1 PASSAGE 2 

Directions: The passages given below are followed by a set of four or five questions each. Choose the best answer to each question.

The only thing worse than being lied to is not knowing you’re being lied to. It’s true that plastic pollution is a huge problem, of planetary proportions. And it’s true we could all do more to reduce our plastic footprint. The lie is that blame for the plastic problem is wasteful consumers and that changing our individual habits will fix it.

Recycling plastic is to saving the Earth what hammering a nail is to halting a falling skyscraper. You struggle to find a place to do it and feel pleased when you succeed. But your effort is wholly inadequate and distracts from the real problem of why the building is collapsing in the first place. The real problem is that single-use plastic—the very idea of producing plastic items like grocery bags, which we use for an average of 12 minutes but can persist in the environment for half a millennium—is an incredibly reckless abuse of technology. Encouraging individuals to recycle more will never solve the problem of a massive production of single-use plastic that should have been avoided in the first place.

As an ecologist and evolutionary biologist, I have had a disturbing window into the accumulating literature on the hazards of plastic pollution. Scientists have long recognized that plastics biodegrade slowly, if at all, and pose multiple threats to wildlife through entanglement and consumption. More recent reports highlight dangers posed by absorption of toxic chemicals in the water and by plastic odours that mimic some species’ natural food. Plastics also accumulate up the food chain, and studies now show that we are likely ingesting it ourselves in seafood. . ..

Beginning in the 1950s, big beverage companies like Coca-Cola and Anheuser-Busch, along with Phillip Morris and others, formed a non-profit called Keep America Beautiful. Its mission is/was to educate and encourage environmental stewardship in the public. . .. At face value, these efforts seem benevolent, but they obscure the real problem, which is the role that corporate polluters play in the plastic problem. This clever misdirection has led journalist and author Heather Rogers to describe Keep America Beautiful as the first corporate greenwashing front, as it has helped shift the public focus to consumer recycling behaviour and actively thwarted legislation that would increase extended producer responsibility for waste management. . .. [T]he greatest success of Keep America Beautiful has been to shift the onus of environmental responsibility onto the public while simultaneously becoming a trusted name in the environmental movement. . ..

So what can we do to make responsible use of plastic a reality? First: reject the lie. Litterbugs are not responsible for the global ecological disaster of plastic. Humans can only function to the best of their abilities, given time, mental bandwidth and systemic constraints. Our huge problem with plastic is the result of a permissive legal framework that has allowed the uncontrolled rise of plastic pollution, despite clear evidence of the harm it causes to local communities and the world’s oceans. Recycling is also too hard in most parts of the U.S. and lacks the proper incentives to make it work well.

6. In the second paragraph, the phrase “what hammering a nail is to halting a falling skyscraper” means:

1. relying on emerging technologies to mitigate the ill-effects of plastic pollution.

2. encouraging the responsible production of plastics by firms.

3. focusing on consumer behaviour to tackle the problem of plastics pollution.

4. focusing on single-use plastic bags to reduce the plastics footprint.    

7. In the first paragraph, the author uses “lie” to refer to the:

1. blame assigned to consumers for indiscriminate use of plastics.

2. understatement of the enormity of the plastics pollution problem.

3. understatement of the effects of recycling plastics.

4. fact that people do not know they have been lied to.    

8. The author lists all of the following as negative effects of the use of plastics EXCEPT the:

1. slow pace of degradation or non-degradation of plastics in the environment.

2. air pollution caused during the process of recycling plastics.

3. adverse impacts on the digestive systems of animals exposed to plastic.

4. poisonous chemicals released into the water and food we consume.    

9. Which of the following interventions would the author most strongly support:

1. completely banning all single-use plastic bags.

2. having all consumers change their plastic consumption habits.

3. recycling all plastic debris in the seabed.

4. passing regulations targeted at producers that generate plastic products.    

10. It can be inferred that the author considers the Keep America Beautiful organisation:

1. an innovative example of a collaborative corporate social responsibility initiative.

2. a sham as it diverted attention away from the role of corporates in plastics pollution.

3. an important step in sensitising producers to the need to tackle plastics pollution.

4. a "greenwash" because it was a benevolent attempt to improve public recycling habits. 

1 comment
Captain_Kalia
@Captain_Kalia  ·  32 karma

EXPLANATORY ANSWERS  

Passage 2

SUITABLE TITLE: Blame for Plastic Pollution Should Go Not to Wasteful Consumers But to the Producers of Plastic

6. Ans. 3.

Explanation

Option 3: The author draws the following analogy in the first sentence, second paragraph: “Recycling Plastic” : “Saving the Earth” : : “Hammering a Nail” : “Halting a Falling Skyscraper” in order to highlight that “recycling plastic by individual consumers (by changing consumer behaviour)” will not tackle the problem of plastic pollution (option 3)—it is wholly inadequate and distracts from the real problem, which is the uncontrolled production of plastics by producers, who should be legally responsible for its waste management. Other options do not explain the objective of the author in drawing the analogy.

7. Ans. 1.

Explanation

Option 1: is directly from: “The lie is that blame for the plastic problem is wasteful consumers and that changing our individual habits will fix it.” The truth is that corporates are to blame for uncontrolled production of plastics. Other options do not describe the ‘lie’ and hence are irrelevant to the question asked.

8. Ans. 2.

Explanation

Option 2: is the exception as it is not mentioned in the passage. Option 1 is from: “…plastics biodegrade slowly, if at all…”; option 3 is from: “…multiple threats to wildlife through entanglement and consumption…”; and option 4 is from: “…dangers posed by absorption of toxic chemicals in the water…” (all in third paragraph).

9. Ans. 4.

Explanation

Option 4: attacks the real problem of plastic pollution as highlighted by the author: “Our huge problem with plastic is the result of a permissive legal framework that has allowed the uncontrolled rise of plastic pollution, despite clear evidence of the harm it causes to local communities and the world’s oceans” (last paragraph). The author will therefore most strongly support action at option 4—the solution must come from shifting responsibility on producers for production and waste management and not on consumers. The author will also strongly support action at option 1 as he considers single-use plastic as an “incredibly reckless use of technology”, but he would support option 4 most strongly. 

10. Ans. 2.

Explanation

Option 2: The non-profit called Keep America Beautiful has been responsible for “greenwashing” (derived from “eyewash”—pretence, sham): disseminating disinformation so as to present an environmentally responsible (“green”) public image by “shifting the public focus to consumer recycling behaviour and actively thwarting legislation that would increase extended producer responsibility for waste management”. Other options show the non-profit organization in a positive light contrary to the author’s intended meaning. 

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ANALYZE YOUR CAT 2018 ANSWERS--WHY YOU WENT WRONG

CAT 2018 Slot 1 Passage 1


Directions: The passages given below are followed by a set of four or five questions each. Choose the best answer to each question.


“Everybody pretty much agrees that the relationship between elephants and people has dramatically changed,” [says psychologist Gay] Bradshaw. . .. “Where for centuries humans and elephants lived in relatively peaceful coexistence, there is now hostility and violence. Now, I use the term ‘violence’ because of the intentionality associated with it, both in the aggression of humans and, at times, the recently observed behaviour of elephants.” . . .

Typically, elephant researchers have cited, as a cause of aggression, the high levels of testosterone in newly matured male elephants or the competition for land and resources between elephants and humans. But. . . Bradshaw and several colleagues argue. . . that today’s elephant populations are suffering from a form of chronic stress, a kind of species-wide trauma. Decades of poaching and culling and habitat loss, they claim, have so disrupted the intricate web of familial and societal relations by which young elephants have traditionally been raised in the wild, and by which established elephant herds are governed, that what we are now witnessing is nothing less than a precipitous collapse of elephant culture. . ..

Elephants, when left to their own devices, are profoundly social creatures. . .. Young elephants are raised within an extended, multitiered network of doting female caregivers that includes the birth mother, grandmothers, aunts and friends. These relations are maintained over a life span as long as 70 years. Studies of established herds have shown that young elephants stay within 15 feet of their mothers for nearly all of their first eight years of life, after which young females are socialized into the matriarchal network, while young males go off for a time into an all-male social group before coming back into the fold as mature adults. . ..

This fabric of elephant society, Bradshaw and her colleagues [demonstrate], ha[s] effectively been frayed by years of habitat loss and poaching, along with systematic culling by government agencies to control elephant numbers and translocations of herds to different habitats. . .. As a result of such social upheaval, calves are now being born to and raised by ever younger and inexperienced mothers. Young orphaned elephants, meanwhile, that have witnessed the death of a parent at the hands of poachers are coming of age in the absence of the support system that defines traditional elephant life. “The loss of elephant elders,” [says] Bradshaw . . . "and the traumatic experience of witnessing the massacres of their family, impairs normal brain and behaviour development in young elephants.”

What Bradshaw and her colleagues describe would seem to be an extreme form of anthropocentric conjecture if the evidence that they’ve compiled from various elephant researchers. . . weren’t so compelling. The elephants of decimated herds, especially orphans who’ve watched the death of their parents and elders from poaching and culling, exhibit behaviour typically associated with post-traumatic stress disorder and other trauma-related disorders in humans: abnormal startle response, unpredictable asocial behaviour, inattentive mothering and hyperaggression. . ..

[According to Bradshaw], “Elephants are suffering and behaving in the same ways that we recognize in ourselves as a result of violence. . .. Except perhaps for a few specific features, brain organization and early development of elephants and humans are extremely similar.”

1. The passage makes all of the following claims EXCEPT:

1. elephant mothers are evolving newer ways of rearing their calves to adapt to emerging threats.

2. the elephant response to deeply disturbing experiences is similar to that of humans.

3. human actions such as poaching and culling have created stressful conditions for elephant communities.

4. elephants establish extended and enduring familial relationships as do humans.

2. Which of the following statements best expresses the overall argument of this passage?

1. Recent elephant behaviour could be understood as a form of species-wide trauma-related response.

2. Elephants, like the humans they are in conflict with, are profoundly social creatures.

3. The relationship between elephants and humans has changed from one of coexistence to one of hostility.

4. The brain organisation and early development of elephants and humans are extremely similar.

 

3. Which of the following measures is Bradshaw most likely to support to address the problem of elephant aggression?

1. Funding of more studies to better understand the impact of testosterone on male elephant aggression.

2. The development of treatment programmes for elephants drawing on insights gained from treating post-traumatic stress disorder in humans.

3. Studying the impact of isolating elephant calves on their early brain development, behaviour and aggression.

4. Increased funding for research into the similarity of humans and other animals drawing on insights gained from human-elephant similarities.

 

4. In paragraph 4, the phrase, “The fabric of elephant society . . . ha(s) effectively been frayed by . . .” is:

1. an accurate description of the condition of elephant herds today.

2. a metaphor for the effect of human activity on elephant communities.

3. an exaggeration aimed at bolstering Bradshaw’s claims.

4. an ode to the fragility of elephant society today.

 

5. In the first paragraph, Bradshaw uses the term “violence” to describe the recent change in the human-elephant relationship because, according to him:

1. there is a purposefulness in human and elephant aggression towards each other.

2. elephant herds and their habitat have been systematically destroyed by humans.

3. human-elephant interactions have changed their character over time.

4. both humans and elephants have killed members of each other’s species.

1 comment
Captain_Kalia
@Captain_Kalia  ·  32 karma

  

EXPLANATORY ANSWERS

Passage 1

SUITABLE TITLE: The Recently Observed Aggressive Behaviour of Elephants towards Humans is the Result of a Species-Wide Trauma Suffered by Elephants

1. Ans. 1.

Explanation

Option 1: is the only claim that has NOT been made in the passage and is contrary to the idea of “observed aggressive behaviour resulting from a species-wide trauma being suffered by elephants”. Options 2 and 3 are stated in the last two paragraphs: “The elephants of decimated herds, especially orphans who’ve watched the death of their parents and elders from poaching and culling, exhibit behaviour typically associated with post-traumatic stress disorder and other trauma-related disorders in humans. . .. Elephants are suffering and behaving in the same ways that we recognize in ourselves as a result of violence. . .. brain organization and early development of elephants and humans are extremely similar.” Option 4 is directly from the third paragraph.

2. Ans. 1.

Explanation

Option 1: best expresses the overall argument and is directly from the second paragraph: “…that today’s elephant populations are suffering from a form of chronic stress, a kind of species-wide trauma…” Options 2, 3 and 4 are true and directly mentioned in the passage but do not capture the essence of the passage.

3. Ans. 2.

Explanation

Option 2: This question is an application-based question. The immediate practical solution (presented in option 2) to the problem of elephant aggression directly emerges from: “The elephants…exhibit behaviour typically associated with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and other trauma-related disorders in humans”. So we should treat elephants suffering from PTSD in the same way as we treat humans suffering from PTSD. The study proposed in option 3 has already been undertaken and results are known that: “…brain organization and early development of elephants and humans are extremely similar.” Study at option 1 is unnecessary as it is known that high levels of testosterone in young male elephants are a cause of aggression; and the study at option 4 is irrelevant to the problem of aggression of elephants. Hence, options 1, 3 and 4 can be eliminated.

 

4. Ans. 2.

Explanation

Option 2: is correct that the phrase “…fabric of elephant society…has been frayed…” is a metaphor (figure of speech) comparing the elephant society to a ‘fabric’ and how human activity has ‘frayed (torn at the edges) the fabric’. It is NOT an accurate or literal description (option 1); it is NOT an exaggeration (option 3) as clear from the fact that elephants have suffered “a kind of species-wide traumanothing less than a precipitous collapse of elephant culture”; and as in option 4, it is NOT an ode (a lyrical poem) generally sung in praise of something or to convey exalted or inspired emotions.

5. Ans. 1.

Explanation

Option 1: Bradshaw uses the term ‘violence’ to highlight that there is determination or resolve or intention or purposefulness in the aggression, as clear from: “Now, I use the term ‘violence’ because of the intentionality associated with it, both in the aggression of humans and, at times, the recently observed behaviour of elephants.” Other options are not direct answers to the pointed question asked.

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TARGET CAT 2019 Start your preparations early for CAT VARC with this book which focusses on RC skills and vocabulary-building: Wiley's Exam Xpert Verbal Ability and Reading Comprehension for CAT https://www.amazon.in/dp/8126576626/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_KD-ACbM6AV9MN

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