[2017] IMS SIMCAT 12 Self Proctored (13th October to 16th October)

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This thread is to post scores and percentiles, and discuss mock related strategies, doubts and queries for IMS SIMCAT 12 [2017].  

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Can anyone who had given CAT 16 compare the difficulty level of DILR of this mock to that of CAT?

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rv95825
@rv95825IIM Lucknow  ·  180 karma

@pratikppawar CAT 16 also.

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pratikppawar
@pratikppawar  ·  197 karma

@rv95825 nope.. it was tough dude... i had taken it last year itself.. just a mere 21 attempts were there

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SIMCAT 12


VARC  55  97.32 :*

DILR 52 99.07

QA 59 95.32  Tham jaa kahin to. Range 90 - 99.97 hai iski


OA 99.47

CAT - Abki baar mai paar
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 Once confined to fantasy and science fiction, time travel is now simply  an engineering problem. Physicists schooled in Newton’s laws believed  that time moved along a straight, steady course, like a speeding arrow.  Then came Einstein in the early 1900s. His equations showed that time is  more like a river. The more mass or energy you possess, the more the  current around you varies. By moving at high velocity, for instance, you  can make time slow down, and when you come to a stop, you’ll be younger  than if you’d remained at rest. Thus, a speedy spacecraft makes a  fairly basic time machine.

Even after Einstein, most physicists  believed the clock ticked in only one direction. Trips to the past were  preposterous. But after having examined Einstein’s equations more  closely, physicists now realize that the river of time may be diverted  into a whirlpool – called a closed timelike curve – or even a fork  leading to a parallel universe. In particular, the more mass you can  concentrate at a single point, the more you can bend the flow.

In  recent years, new designs for time machines have been flying off  drawing boards at the world’s top science labs. Exact specifications  depend on where in time and space you wish to travel. You’ll need a  hefty CPU to solve the relevant equations for your machine’s precise  size, shape, motion, location, surroundings, and so on; the more  accurately you can nail down these variables, the closer you’ll come to  your intended destination.

The design that follows doesn’t have  the panache of Doc Brown’s DeLorean in Back to the Future or even H. G.  Wells’ brass and quartz dream machine, but it does put time travel  within reach of anyone with a couple of fast spaceships, a supercomputer  and a solar-system-scale machine shop. Warning: When going back in  time, do not – repeat – do not kill your parents before you are born. I  take no responsibility for parallel universes in which you find yourself  trapped for eternity.

Thorne Plates: When Carl  Sagan was writing his 1985 novel Contact, he asked physicist Kip Thorne  how to abbreviate the lengthy flight time required for a trip to a  distant star. Thorne suggested a wormhole, a shortcut through space-time  that almost certainly exists as a consequence of Einsteinian  principles, although one has yet to be detected. A few years later,  Thorne suggested that a wormhole’s entrances could be positioned in  space and time as desired. Unlike some other time machines, this  Thorne-inspired design allows round trips. However, it can’t take you  back to a time before the machine was built. Here’s how it works:

•  Obtain four large conductive plates at least a few miles in diameter.  Arrange them in parallel, very close together. The space between each  plate will teem with negative energy – a proven phenomenon known as the  Casimir effect – creating slices of identical space-time.
• Separate the plates into two pairs. A wormhole will connect the pairs like an umbilical cord.
•  Place one pair in a rocket ship and accelerate to almost the speed of  light, preferably in a circular path so the rocket doesn’t stray too  far. Time will nearly freeze for that set while the other, still on the  ground, ages at the usual rate. With each passing moment, the  space-borne plates will go farther back in time relative to the others.
•  When a sufficient amount of time has passed – preferably decades – step  between the earthbound plates. You’ll immediately be transported back  in time and across space to the other pair.

Fine print:  To activate Thorne plates, the distance between each plate must be less  than the width of an atom. The resulting wormhole will be equally  small, so getting in and out might be difficult. To widen the portal,  some scientists suggest using a laser to inject immense amounts of  negative energy. In addition, Thorne believes that radiation effects  created by gravitons, or particles of gravity, might fry you as you  enter the wormhole. According to string theory, however, this probably  won’t happen, so it’s scant reason to cancel your trip. 


 

If you want to travel to the past, you would need to:
[a] Build a ‘Thorne Plates’ type of time machine.
[b] Gather a very large amount of mass in one spot.
[c] Travel in a spacecraft going at nearly the speed of light.

Either [a] or [b]

Either [b] or [c]

Either [a] or [c]

Any one of [a], [b] or [c]


THe solution given says: " Method [c] is incorrect. Travelling at velocities close to that of light  will, conceptually, take us into the future and not the past. "


Howver, in the passage, nowhere it can be inferred that travelling at speeds close to light would take one into the future. but in para 1, it is given: "By moving at high velocity, for instance, you  can make time slow down, and when you come to a stop, you’ll be younger  than if you’d remained at rest. Thus, a speedy spacecraft makes a  fairly basic time machine."  That implies that travelling at high velocities would take one into the past, contradiction to what is given in the solution!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Can anyone elucidiate?


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BiswadipROY
@BiswadipROYNMIMS Mumbai  ·  194 karma

@superstuddest From what I make of it

"you’ll be younger than if you’d remained at rest"

It means u will remain the same and everything else will move ahead...so in short u have gone into the future as everything has moved ahead except you. Do let me know if u have any alternate explainations

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superstuddest
@superstuddest  ·  3 karma

I concur with you. Here is other of a conflict.                                                 "Place one pair in a rocket ship and accelerate to almost the speed of light, preferably in a circular path so the rocket doesn’t stray too far. Time will nearly freeze for that set while the other, still on the ground, ages at the usual rate. With each passing moment, the space-borne plates will go farther back in time relative to the others.

• When a sufficient amount of time has passed – preferably decades – step between the earthbound plates. You’ll immediately be transported back in time and across space to the other pair."                                                                                   That means when we go from spaceship to earth, we will go into the future, as in spaceship 5 min have passed, whereas on earth 5 yrs have elapsed. That means thorne plates also take into the future, not the past, as given in the solution. Kindly elaborate.


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Hello Puys!

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how to solve that tennis player set? is there any trick to get all the cases? i took a lot of time whereas when i saw the average no of people who attempted,its quite high.. so how do you people do it?

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OA 141 95.91 %ile please tell approximate rank QA17A 17 correct 51 LR 14A12 C 36 VA 23 A 19C 54

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shaikadil875
@shaikadil875IIM Trichy  ·  130 karma

470

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In the 2nd RC, can someone please explain the anecdote concerning the 12 beggars? Didn't understand it and the explanation in the solution also seemed confusing.

CAT '18 98.89%ile | IIFT (MBA IB Batch 2018-20)
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SIMCAT 12 (Late taker)


VARC (47) 90.92

DILR (46) 97.11

QA (59) 95.56


OA (152) 97.97 

CAT '18 98.89%ile | IIFT (MBA IB Batch 2018-20)
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Has anyone tried the CAT 500 book from IMS? Is it any good?

GEMF | Calls: IIFT, SP Jain, NMIMS, IIM Cap, MDI, DFS, DSE, DBE, IMI  | Converts: DFS, NMIMS, IIM Ksp, IIM Am, IIM Bg, IIM Sb, IIM Sm, IMI, DSE, DBE
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Crazygenius
@CrazygeniusNMIMS Mumbai  ·  1,569 karma

So is the book good and upto expectations?

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alexander8976
@alexander8976  ·  2 karma

Good if you want to reach up to 99+but can't help you beyond 99.5...

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SIMCAT 12


VARC - 51- 30A 20C - 94.77 :( :( 

DILR - 54 - 22A 19C - 99.42

QA - 86 - 32A 29C - 99.99 :) 


OA - 191 - 84A 68C - 99.98

AIR 2

CAT17 - 100%ile   CAT16 - 99.26%ile     Mock score repository -  https://goo.gl/cJTUPh
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