About this discussion

Last updated

Author
Hari Raghavachari @baccardisprite

Tags

International educational options beyond the MBA

Hello PGs, Having been a PG for the last 2+ years, and having observed posts and threads across the International Section of the forums, I find that many are relatively less aware of some of the other interesting educational avenues availabl...
Follow this discussion to get notified of latest updates.
Page 60 of 158   

Hi Baccardisprite,

You are doing a great help for everyone. Thanks a lot for you effort :-P

I'm a B.Sc(Electronics) graduate with 5 years of experience in IT (SAP Business Intelligence). Acads not very good (10th - 86%; 12th - 58%; B.Sc - 65%)

Planning to write GMAT in Aug-Sept and apply to European/Asian B-Schools.

I was told that most of the schools in US ask for a 4 years degree. Is this correct? Are there any programs in US which consider a 3 years degree?
I hope in Europe, they accept a 3 year degree as well.
Please throw some light on this.

Kindly suggest some good MBA/Masters/M.Sc program in Europe/Asia suitable for my education and work experience.

Thanks in advance :-P
Walker

I am a recent graduate in B.Tech chemical engineering from a top ranked NIT and have recently joined an FMCG multinational as a supply chain trainee. It took a month for me to realize that I do not enjoy factory work; the career path in this company typically expects a fresher to spend four years(including one year of training) in a factory before moving to front end supply chain functions like demand planning, forecasting etc.

I have always had an interest in advertising and brand management. Well, I think I will be good at it. Have no experience in it to talk of, but I am pretty creative and have good communication skills(Good at chaatna per se). So, I am presuming I will be.

I gave CAT, XAT and MICAT in my final year. Missed the mark narrowly in all. I don't think I want to give another try for indian MBA exams. Saps up all your energy. I am writing my GMAT this august. Expecting a good score, or so the mocks do suggest.

I would want some guidance. Which of the following options look credible and should be advised, in context of my general future career ambitions?

1) Stick to the job and apply for MBA few years later

Pros: The growth is great, the brand of the company is so strong that after 4 years of work ex people get admits into Harvard, Kellogs and Wharton commonly.
Cons: Simply coz I hate the work I have to do.


2) Apply for MSc Management. I have zeroed down on a few colleges like LBS, LSE, HEC Paris, EM Lyon, ESCP etc.

Pros: Immediately after the degree, I should be able to work in fields I like. I can succesfully work my career to a stage where I am ready for an exe MBA or a higher degree, whatever the circumstances govern.
Cons: I somehow find these courses little shady. What about the job scenario, especially for a non local student. I am in fact worried whether doing an MSc management will put me one step behind where I was before the course.


3) Shift to a KPO/consultancy. Got contacts in a few like Copal Partners, ZS, Evalueserve etc. Can work on these companies and shift.

Pros: Even though I don't get to work in marketing, I atleast work in relevant fields. Atleast it is not a factory job! I can wake up in the mornings and go to my job, happy...
Cons: Leaving a great company. Probably a lower pay. The current company will help the CV stand out to a certain degree when applying for an MBA; its one of India's biggest CEO factories. Not sure of that after shifting.

Kindly advice. I really feel like I am on crossroads..Also I want to know the ground reality of the MSc Management programs in the good schools(the ones I mentioned). The colorful course brochures leave much to skepticism.


Not to critique you, but didn't you know that they'd send you to a factory before you actually signed up with them? Can you tell us why you don't like factory work? Is it the physical work? 4 years isn't a particularly long time. Manufacturing + SC experience in a large FMCG company is more than just the brand. SC specialists & managers from FMCG are in huge demand from many industries (including consulting, perhaps excluding banking) simply because of their ability to manage complexity (you'll hear that a lot where you work :-))....

This is the heart of a product & manufacturing company's operation (supply chain being the veins & arteries :-))! As someone who went through the operations bit for 6 years in my pre-MBA career (lessons I use to this day), I can tell you that you will be a much better marketer if you know the value chain (i.e the truth) of what you're selling to your customer / consumer!

Send me a PM if you want, I just think you're frittering a major opportunity here to gain some serious & tangible skill and yes, position yourself for a great career enabled by an MBA in a top school....

To answer your questions:

1. Gain the experience!
2. Waste of time, considering what you have.
3. I don't see why/how the shift to "marketing" is easier from the places you describe.

Think, then post/PM.
All the best
Baccardisprite
  • 2 Likes  
Dear Baccardisprite

I've tried to go through all of your previous replies (from the time the thread started in 2008 ) so as to make a correct balance between being a optimist and a realist

My background -
B.E. I.T. with higher second class. Working in the domain of e-learning and eGovernance in a PSU for the past 2 years as a Systems Engineer (Server Administrator) with lots of client interaction. Decent ECs.

I'm planning to apply for Fall 2013 since my present financial commitments will not allow me to go for Fall 2012. So, I will have around 44 months of work experience by then. I want to shift towards a management oriented role (certainly not the first amongst the IT crowd) and want to pursue a degree in Canada for the same. I don't want to go to US or UK after hearing lots of horror stories.

But like you said earlier, and I totally agree, that getting into jobs like Marketing, where lot of client interaction is required is difficult since we don't have local job experience there. You also recommended to get into a vertical such as Finance, Operations etc which will be more suited right now and then try to switch verticals (if our interests lie there) once we have local work experience.

So my master plan, pardon the pun, is to go in for a masters degree (something like Finance Master Program in Vancouver - Master of Financial Risk Management (MFRM) - Beedie School of Business, SFU, Canada) which will be more focused (and easy on the pocket) into a domain such as finance, operations etc. Get local work experience, save money and apply for a top MBA after 2-3 years. My main interest here is that prospective employers should find me worth their money after my MBA so that I get a good job and hence a good ROI.

Does the plan sound any good? Should I go in for some other certification like CFA before I apply? I am quite clueless in this regard.

Waiting eagerly for your advice! :)

PS: Sorry for the extremely long post.


First - are you interested in Finance? If yes, then make sure you signal that to the business schools you apply to and future employers (anywhere) through either experience or targeted professional education - that you're serious about a career in Finance. Since you're not in a finance career now, I'd recommend passing at least 2 levels of the CFA before you go to school, and working hard on the GMAT and try scoring 720+ (banks would want to see something that reflects your academic & numerate ability).

SFU is a 2/3rd tier university in Canada. Even with a work-permit policy that's friendlier to Internationals than that in the UK/US, what makes you think going to a 2/3rd tier university in Canada makes it any good there versus 2/3rd universities in the UK/US for those markets?

I have always recommended in more than one post to go to the best university you can in the geography you try to access. Therefore, if this is Canada, then you're way better off going to Rotman, Ivey, Queens or Schulich for your MBA. These are the Top Canadian schools and seeing what little you've posted about your profile, you'd be at least competitive for those schools (if you got a 700+ GMAT + top notch recommendations & write good essays). Why SFU?

You'd have the same money issues later as well? You'd be paying off a lotz of debt for a Masters in Finance you really don't need. Nearly 4 years of experience is actually at the low end, but you'd get a look in at the schools MBA programs if you had all the criteria I described above.

Think it over and post again
Baccardisprite
  • 2 Likes  

Hey guys..found a very informative site for international MBA

GenieTalks- Your Questions Answered! Its all about your Education & Career!

I am a recent graduate in B.Tech chemical engineering from a top ranked NIT and have recently joined an FMCG multinational as a supply chain trainee. It took a month for me to realize that I do not enjoy factory work; the career path in this company typically expects a fresher to spend four years(including one year of training) in a factory before moving to front end supply chain functions like demand planning, forecasting etc.

I have always had an interest in advertising and brand management. Well, I think I will be good at it. Have no experience in it to talk of, but I am pretty creative and have good communication skills(Good at chaatna per se). So, I am presuming I will be.

I gave CAT, XAT and MICAT in my final year. Missed the mark narrowly in all. I don't think I want to give another try for indian MBA exams. Saps up all your energy. I am writing my GMAT this august. Expecting a good score, or so the mocks do suggest.

I would want some guidance. Which of the following options look credible and should be advised, in context of my general future career ambitions?

1) Stick to the job and apply for MBA few years later

Pros: The growth is great, the brand of the company is so strong that after 4 years of work ex people get admits into Harvard, Kellogs and Wharton commonly.
Cons: Simply coz I hate the work I have to do.


2) Apply for MSc Management. I have zeroed down on a few colleges like LBS, LSE, HEC Paris, EM Lyon, ESCP etc.

Pros: Immediately after the degree, I should be able to work in fields I like. I can succesfully work my career to a stage where I am ready for an exe MBA or a higher degree, whatever the circumstances govern.
Cons: I somehow find these courses little shady. What about the job scenario, especially for a non local student. I am in fact worried whether doing an MSc management will put me one step behind where I was before the course.


3) Shift to a KPO/consultancy. Got contacts in a few like Copal Partners, ZS, Evalueserve etc. Can work on these companies and shift.

Pros: Even though I don't get to work in marketing, I atleast work in relevant fields. Atleast it is not a factory job! I can wake up in the mornings and go to my job, happy...
Cons: Leaving a great company. Probably a lower pay. The current company will help the CV stand out to a certain degree when applying for an MBA; its one of India's biggest CEO factories. Not sure of that after shifting.

Kindly advice. I really feel like I am on crossroads..Also I want to know the ground reality of the MSc Management programs in the good schools(the ones I mentioned). The colorful course brochures leave much to skepticism.

My opinion on your options:
1. As you said the brand is great and would help you get into the premier colleges.
pros: - Always a very good choice as the brand of your MBA will stay with you for a long time, though it does dilute a high amount in the first one year.
- You can always make a career switch focusing on the industry you already worked with.
Cons: - it is always difficult if you want to change both industry and function, you might have to start a step back - esp. considering the loans you would incur with studying at the institutes you mention - probably you would be forced to rethink.

2. These courses are not shady cause you mentioned some respectable institutes. They would help you make a switch much earlier in your career and it wouldnt hurt you much to start afresh. With 4-5 years work ex i'm sure you wouldnt want to start again at the bottom of the chain.

3. No sure. from my personal experience - the brand i work for helped me a lot in my MBA apps.

A word of advice - at some point you need to make a decision - and then take things as they come. I know its easier said than done ( i felt the same when people told me this ).

I feel if you could get into consultancy like ZS, Accenture etc. and then try for an international MBA it will be great for your profile.

I am a recent graduate in B.Tech chemical engineering from a top ranked NIT and have recently joined an FMCG multinational as a supply chain trainee. It took a month for me to realize that I do not enjoy factory work; the career path in this company typically expects a fresher to spend four years(including one year of training) in a factory before moving to front end supply chain functions like demand planning, forecasting etc.

I have always had an interest in advertising and brand management. Well, I think I will be good at it. Have no experience in it to talk of, but I am pretty creative and have good communication skills(Good at chaatna per se). So, I am presuming I will be.

I gave CAT, XAT and MICAT in my final year. Missed the mark narrowly in all. I don't think I want to give another try for indian MBA exams. Saps up all your energy. I am writing my GMAT this august. Expecting a good score, or so the mocks do suggest.

I would want some guidance. Which of the following options look credible and should be advised, in context of my general future career ambitions?

1) Stick to the job and apply for MBA few years later

Pros: The growth is great, the brand of the company is so strong that after 4 years of work ex people get admits into Harvard, Kellogs and Wharton commonly.
Cons: Simply coz I hate the work I have to do.


2) Apply for MSc Management. I have zeroed down on a few colleges like LBS, LSE, HEC Paris, EM Lyon, ESCP etc.

Pros: Immediately after the degree, I should be able to work in fields I like. I can succesfully work my career to a stage where I am ready for an exe MBA or a higher degree, whatever the circumstances govern.
Cons: I somehow find these courses little shady. What about the job scenario, especially for a non local student. I am in fact worried whether doing an MSc management will put me one step behind where I was before the course.


3) Shift to a KPO/consultancy. Got contacts in a few like Copal Partners, ZS, Evalueserve etc. Can work on these companies and shift.

Pros: Even though I don't get to work in marketing, I atleast work in relevant fields. Atleast it is not a factory job! I can wake up in the mornings and go to my job, happy...
Cons: Leaving a great company. Probably a lower pay. The current company will help the CV stand out to a certain degree when applying for an MBA; its one of India's biggest CEO factories. Not sure of that after shifting.

Kindly advice. I really feel like I am on crossroads..Also I want to know the ground reality of the MSc Management programs in the good schools(the ones I mentioned). The colorful course brochures leave much to skepticism.

Chain se sona hai to Jaag Jao..
hey

I would like some information about pursuing an MS in Finance. especially about, what are you job opportunities after doing this course, and if it is comparable to someone who does an MBA with finance specialization.

also, what are the top universities in USA for pursuing this course, and is a gre score sufficient for it?


If you read this thread, specifically between posts 860 & 890, there's a lot of discussion between some posters and myself - where M.Sc's in Finance, and the career opportunities thereafter are articulated in some detail.

Please read those and if you still have specific queries, come back and post here.

All the best
Baccardisprite
  • 2 Likes  

Dear Baccardisprite

I've tried to go through all of your previous replies (from the time the thread started in 2008 ) so as to make a correct balance between being a optimist and a realist

My background -
B.E. I.T. with higher second class. Working in the domain of e-learning and eGovernance in a PSU for the past 2 years as a Systems Engineer (Server Administrator) with lots of client interaction. Decent ECs.

I'm planning to apply for Fall 2013 since my present financial commitments will not allow me to go for Fall 2012. So, I will have around 44 months of work experience by then. I want to shift towards a management oriented role (certainly not the first amongst the IT crowd) and want to pursue a degree in Canada for the same. I don't want to go to US or UK after hearing lots of horror stories.

But like you said earlier, and I totally agree, that getting into jobs like Marketing, where lot of client interaction is required is difficult since we don't have local job experience there. You also recommended to get into a vertical such as Finance, Operations etc which will be more suited right now and then try to switch verticals (if our interests lie there) once we have local work experience.

So my master plan, pardon the pun, is to go in for a masters degree (something like Finance Master Program in Vancouver - Master of Financial Risk Management (MFRM) - Beedie School of Business, SFU, Canada) which will be more focused (and easy on the pocket) into a domain such as finance, operations etc. Get local work experience, save money and apply for a top MBA after 2-3 years. My main interest here is that prospective employers should find me worth their money after my MBA so that I get a good job and hence a good ROI.

Does the plan sound any good? Should I go in for some other certification like CFA before I apply? I am quite clueless in this regard.

Waiting eagerly for your advice! :)

PS: Sorry for the extremely long post.

hey

I would like some information about pursuing an MS in Finance. especially about, what are you job opportunities after doing this course, and if it is comparable to someone who does an MBA with finance specialization.

also, what are the top universities in USA for pursuing this course, and is a gre score sufficient for it?

Follow This Discussion

When you follow a discussion, you receive notifications about new posts and comments. You can unfollow a discussion anytime, or turn off notifications for it.

6609 people follow this discussion.