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Can Any one Help me with This!!!

LCDs apply thin-film transistors (TFTs) of amorphous or
polycrystalline silicon sandwiched between two glass
plates. The TFTs supply voltage to liquid-crystal-filled cells,
or pixels, between the sheets of glass. When hit with an
electric charge, the liquid crystals untwist to an exact
degree to filter white light generated by a lamp. This
filtered light shines directly on the viewing screen or, in
the case of projection televisions, is projected through a
small chip that acts as a lens. LCDs that are capable of
producing color images, such as in televisions and
computers, reproduce colors through a process of
subtraction, blocking out particular color wavelengths from
the spectrum of white light until only the desired color
remains. It is the variation of the intensity of light permitted
to pass through the matrix of liquid crystals that enables
LCD displays to present images full of gradations of
different colors.

What is the correct ans for the following question

1. The process through which an LCD monitor displays
different colors is most closely analogous to
-stream of grains of sand fall into the lower portion
-of a mixture according to size
-performances within are muted to those outside
-characters cut out such that a lamp in front of the
paper casts shadows in the shapes of the characters
-while an air conditioning system cools the interior of
the building


Hi boss, how is answer D any explanation? \
ISBCo2014 spreadsheet - https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AkGkc0yWHIvAdE9DZ2UwbDB4TlIxZkpnZnZITUpEemc

Can Any one Help me with This!!!

LCDs apply thin-film transistors (TFTs) of amorphous or
polycrystalline silicon sandwiched between two glass
plates. The TFTs supply voltage to liquid-crystal-filled cells,
or pixels, between the sheets of glass. When hit with an
electric charge, the liquid crystals untwist to an exact
degree to filter white light generated by a lamp. This
filtered light shines directly on the viewing screen or, in
the case of projection televisions, is projected through a
small chip that acts as a lens. LCDs that are capable of
producing color images, such as in televisions and
computers, reproduce colors through a process of
subtraction, blocking out particular color wavelengths from
the spectrum of white light until only the desired color
remains. It is the variation of the intensity of light permitted
to pass through the matrix of liquid crystals that enables
LCD displays to present images full of gradations of
different colors.

What is the correct ans for the following question

1. The process through which an LCD monitor displays
different colors is most closely analogous to
-stream of grains of sand fall into the lower portion
-of a mixture according to size
-performances within are muted to those outside
-characters cut out such that a lamp in front of the
paper casts shadows in the shapes of the characters
-while an air conditioning system cools the interior of
the building

RC 99 - Passage 25

Georges LeClerc (1707-1780) proposed a mechanism for calculating the
age of the Earth using molten spheres of iron and measuring cooling
times, after which he proposed that the Earth was at least 75,000 years
old and perhaps as old as three million years.

Some students may feel that we should not focus on the past, and
that our thoughts should be trained on new knowledge and invention,
rather than antiquated ideas. What these students do not understand is
the importance of the old ideas in shaping our current understanding of
the world around us, and that an outright dismissal of past theories
simply because they have been rejected by new evidence may limit our
understanding of current theories.

There is value of learning about hypotheses that were once espoused
to explain an observed phenomenon, but that have now been long
disproved and invalidated. Darwin's theory of natural selection as the
mechanism for evolution is all too often taught in a vacuum in high school
biology classrooms, as if this brilliant naturalist developed a ground-
breaking theory on natural order which had never before been
contemplated in any form. It is only by learning about the gradual
development of evolutionary theory, and the role of some religious
individuals in shaping this theory, that students may come to see the
logic and power behind Darwin's relatively simple ideas.

Many of the contributions upon which Darwin built his ideas came
from scientists who were staunch creationists themselves. These
scientists believed that all organisms on Earth had been placed here
through special creation,ďż˝- by God, because there was little evidence at
the time to support evolution. LeClerc also perceived that species were
not fixed and could change over time; he even proposed that closely
related species, such as the horse and donkey, had developed from a
common ancestor and had been modified by different climactic
conditions. Yet, LeClerc was a devout Christian creationist and devoted
much of his writing to the debunking of evolutionary ideas. Despite their
commitments to religion, LeClerc and Linnaeus both gave Darwin crucial
raw material to work with-their ideas concerning the similarities between
related species and possible connections with common ancestors cried
out for a reasonable explanation.

For centuries before Darwin, data that challenged the biblical account
of creation was surfacing in many fields of research. As explorers began
to study the forces that shape the Earth, such as mountain building and
volcanic eruptions, accounts from scripture and assertions that the Earth
was very young began to be called into question. Uniformitarian
geologists such as Charles Lyell felt that the only reason mountains and
other features of the Earth's terrain had been built the way they had was
because of long, gradual processes that shaped these structures. There
was no way, he felt, that the Earth could be several thousand years old
as asserted in the Bible. In addition, the discovery of new plants,
animals, and fossils as explorers travelled to uncharted regions of the
world aroused suspicion about the paucity of animal and plant kindsďż˝- in
the Bible. Improvements in scientists' abilities to estimate the age of the
Earth and the relative ages of fossils also pushed people to question old
assumptions.


Q 1: Taking into account all that was argued by the author, the main idea of this passage is that:

A. religious scientists before Darwin greatly influenced his formation of
the theory of natural selection.

B. similarities between species of plants and animals were too great to
ignore as people attempted to explain relationships in nature.

C. Darwin relied on a great deal of information from those who lived
before him as he formed his well-known conclusions about the
mechanisms of evolution.

D. old ideas should not be dismissed simply because they are old and
disproved.

E. There is no connection between old ideas and new ones


2. If the author were teaching a class on evolution in a university in the Unites States, the passage suggests that the class would spend a significant amount of time discussing:

A. the origins of Darwin's theory of natural selection.
B. details of Darwin's theory of natural selection.
C. the Biblical account of creation.
D. taxonomy and classification and their importance in Darwin's ideas.
E. the future of evolution

I am getting confused with these 2 questions, can someone pls help me out.


1. Answer of first is D. From passage -

Some students may feel that we should not focus on the past, and
that our thoughts should be trained on new knowledge and invention,
rather than antiquated ideas. What these students do not understand is
the importance of the old ideas in shaping our current understanding of
the world around us,
and that an outright dismissal of past theories
simply because they have been rejected by new evidence may limit our
understanding of current theories.


Subsequent text is supporting how past theories helped darwin to come up with his theory and how old theories provided base for him.

2. Answer is A

Darwin's theory of natural selection as the
mechanism for evolution is all too often taught in a vacuum in high school
biology classrooms
, as if this brilliant naturalist developed a ground-
breaking theory on natural order which had never before been
contemplated in any form. It is only by learning about the gradual
development of evolutionary theory, and the role of some religious
individuals in shaping this theory
, that students may come to see the
logic and power behind Darwin's relatively simple ideas.
  • 1 Like  
ISBCo2014 spreadsheet - https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AkGkc0yWHIvAdE9DZ2UwbDB4TlIxZkpnZnZITUpEemc
Jyotikumarcts Says
My take is C because, if you see the best parts of paragraph is about the Drawins inspiration from bible or old ideas. So it must be C

1.But I think the option (c) will be a specific topic.
and the author is talking about the main idea which is general that stated by option (d).
So acc to me the answer should be (d)

2. I think it is pretty clear.
I go for (c).
RC 99 - Passage 25

Georges LeClerc (1707-1780) proposed a mechanism for calculating the
age of the Earth using molten spheres of iron and measuring cooling
times, after which he proposed that the Earth was at least 75,000 years
old and perhaps as old as three million years.

Some students may feel that we should not focus on the past, and
that our thoughts should be trained on new knowledge and invention,
rather than antiquated ideas. What these students do not understand is
the importance of the old ideas in shaping our current understanding of
the world around us, and that an outright dismissal of past theories
simply because they have been rejected by new evidence may limit our
understanding of current theories.

There is value of learning about hypotheses that were once espoused
to explain an observed phenomenon, but that have now been long
disproved and invalidated. Darwins theory of natural selection as the
mechanism for evolution is all too often taught in a vacuum in high school
biology classrooms, as if this brilliant naturalist developed a ground-
breaking theory on natural order which had never before been
contemplated in any form. It is only by learning about the gradual
development of evolutionary theory, and the role of some religious
individuals in shaping this theory, that students may come to see the
logic and power behind Darwins relatively simple ideas.

Many of the contributions upon which Darwin built his ideas came
from scientists who were staunch creationists themselves. These
scientists believed that all organisms on Earth had been placed here
through special creation,ďż˝- by God, because there was little evidence at
the time to support evolution. LeClerc also perceived that species were
not fixed and could change over time; he even proposed that closely
related species, such as the horse and donkey, had developed from a
common ancestor and had been modified by different climactic
conditions. Yet, LeClerc was a devout Christian creationist and devoted
much of his writing to the debunking of evolutionary ideas. Despite their
commitments to religion, LeClerc and Linnaeus both gave Darwin crucial
raw material to work with-their ideas concerning the similarities between
related species and possible connections with common ancestors cried
out for a reasonable explanation.

For centuries before Darwin, data that challenged the biblical account
of creation was surfacing in many fields of research. As explorers began
to study the forces that shape the Earth, such as mountain building and
volcanic eruptions, accounts from scripture and assertions that the Earth
was very young began to be called into question. Uniformitarian
geologists such as Charles Lyell felt that the only reason mountains and
other features of the Earths terrain had been built the way they had was
because of long, gradual processes that shaped these structures. There
was no way, he felt, that the Earth could be several thousand years old
as asserted in the Bible. In addition, the discovery of new plants,
animals, and fossils as explorers travelled to uncharted regions of the
world aroused suspicion about the paucity of animal and plant kindsďż˝- in
the Bible. Improvements in scientists abilities to estimate the age of the
Earth and the relative ages of fossils also pushed people to question old
assumptions.


Q 1: Taking into account all that was argued by the author, the main idea of this passage is that:

A. religious scientists before Darwin greatly influenced his formation of
the theory of natural selection.

B. similarities between species of plants and animals were too great to
ignore as people attempted to explain relationships in nature.

C. Darwin relied on a great deal of information from those who lived
before him as he formed his well-known conclusions about the
mechanisms of evolution.

D. old ideas should not be dismissed simply because they are old and
disproved.

E. There is no connection between old ideas and new ones

My take is A, selection of fittest :).
B- just an example of the idea
C-definately not the main idea.
D- Very genreric
E-not in league.

2. If the author were teaching a class on evolution in a university in the Unites States, the passage suggests that the class would spend a significant amount of time discussing:

A. the origins of Darwins theory of natural selection.
B. details of Darwins theory of natural selection.
C. the Biblical account of creation.
D. taxonomy and classification and their importance in Darwins ideas.
E. the future of evolution

I am getting confused with these 2 questions, can someone pls help me out.


My take is C because, if you see the best parts of paragraph is about the Drawins inspiration from bible or old ideas. So it must be C
help me out with the following RC:

the desert tortoise
:


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tarun g Says
While option D does seem to be the correct answer i dont see any problem in option B either. the passage states that only 5% of the infant tortoises reach adulthood because they are neglected by adults. Can there be two correct answers to this question?


D should be the correct choice, since mortality rates of the whole desert tortoise population is being talked about. If it would be infants, then B could have been correct.
This is what makes the data(5% reaching adulthood) incomplete.
My take:--
option D- Rabbits were abundant in the habitat of the desert tortoise.
Expl- Have a look at the above bold portion of the passage..... if the rabbits are scarce then larger predators dig out the tortoises so if they are more then it negates this danger and they will also survive the extreme temperatures.
Hence, it will significantly decrease the desert tortoise mortality rate.

IIM CATCHER Says
It is Option D.None of the other options are satisfactory.This option stands out alone to be the correct answer.


While option D does seem to be the correct answer i dont see any problem in option B either. the passage states that only 5% of the infant tortoises reach adulthood because they are neglected by adults. Can there be two correct answers to this question?
CAT-12: 98.94; CAT-11: 92.50 Calls: FMS, MDI, New IIM's (NITIE & IIFT not applied); Skipped: New IIM's; Converted: MDI PGPM 2015 batch
help me out with the following RC:

the desert tortoise


Despite its 1989 designation as a threatened species under the federal Endangered Species Act, the desert tortoise, Gopherus agassizii, has declined in numbers by ninety per

It can be inferred from the passage that the desert tortoise mortality rate would be most likely to decrease if which of the following were true?


a.Male and female tortoises mated more frequently.
b.Adult tortoises provided better care for their young.
c.Forage plants were abundant in the habitat of the desert tortoise.
d.Rabbits were abundant in the habitat of the desert tortoise.
e.Desert tortoise burrows were cooler.


It is Option D.None of the other options are satisfactory.This option stands out alone to be the correct answer.
help me out with the following RC:

the desert tortoise



Despite its 1989 designation as a threatened --------------------------------------------- For protection from predators, as well as from desert temperature extremes, tortoises of all ages burrow into the earth. However, if rabbits and rodents are scarce, larger mammalian predators may dig tortoises out of their burrows, devouring even mature tortoises despite their hardened shells.

My take:--
option D- Rabbits were abundant in the habitat of the desert tortoise.
Expl- Have a look at the above bold portion of the passage..... if the rabbits are scarce then larger predators dig out the tortoises so if they are more then it negates this danger and they will also survive the extreme temperatures.
Hence, it will significantly decrease the desert tortoise mortality rate.
IIM A | KDT 09| BDT 11 | SBT 11

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