About this discussion

Last updated

Author
Sachin . @Govi

Tags

GMAT Reading Comprehension Discussions

The GMAT and Related Discussions section is very fragmented in terms of the information available at one's disposal. There are one of reply threads and several other redundant threads that have masked the more important ones. This is an atte...
Follow this discussion to get notified of latest updates.
Page 15 of 24   

Linda Kerber argued in the mid-1980's that after the American Revolution (1775-1783), an ideology of "republican motherhood" resulted in a surge of educational opportunities for women in the United States. Kerber maintained that the leaders of the new nation wanted women to be educated in order to raise politically virtuous sons. A virtuous citizenry was considered essential to the success of the country's republican form of government; virtue was to be instilled not only by churches and schools, but by families, where the mother's role was crucial. Thus, according to Kerber, motherhood became pivotal to the fate of the republic, providing justification for an unprecedented attention to female education.
Introduction of the republican motherhood thesis dramatically changed historiography. Prior to Kerber's work, educational historians barely mentioned women and girls; Thomas Woody's 1929 work is the notable exception. Examining newspaper advertisements for academies, Woody found that educational opportunities increased for both girls and boys around 1750. Pointing to "An Essay on Woman" (1753) as reflecting
a shift in view, Woody also claimed that practical education for females had many advocates before the Revolution. Woody's evidence challenges the notion that the Revolution changed attitudes regarding female education, although it may have accelerated earlier trends. Historians' reliance on Kerber's "republican motherhood" thesis may have obscured the presence of these trends, making it difficult to determine to what extent the Revolution really changed women's lives.


---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Question:


According to the passage, within the field of educational history, Thomas Woody's 1929 work was

A.innovative because it relied on newspaper advertisements as evidence
B.exceptional in that it concentrated on the period before the American Revolution
C.unusual in that it focused on educational attitudes rather than on educational practices
D.controversial in its claims regarding educational opportunities for boys
E.atypical in that it examined the education of girls

kapilkalra85 Says
hey guys.. i gave two tests of gprep and one of powerprep..and scored 650 in all three.. where can i xpext my actual score... sc is hurting me most........could nyone guide me


kapilkalra85,
gmatprep has been considered as the closest to the actual gmat in providing your score range. Having said that, there are a lot of scenarios where people have exceeded it and fell way behind, equally likely. It all matters your frame of mind and how you do things on the G day.

Anyways, if SC is hurting you the most, get hold of Manhattan SC guide and do it end to end. If you did that already, then do it again. If not, then surely you have a confidence issue too...which will require practice and more practice.

SC is one the easiest of verbal to fix. Do NOT trust your ear. If it sounds good, it does not mean its right. A few GMAC rules, and methods...get a grip of them and you will be in good shape. CR and RCs are tougher to fix, IMO.

Good Luck.
FORE School of Management, New Delhi

FORE has been ranked as A*** at Delhi NCR level, highest rating, by research firm CRISIL in 2014.

Located in the heart of South Delhi, FORE provides contextual learning and helps in the development of students as thinking professionals, who have the ability to meet the future challenges of tomorrow's corporate leaders.

Know More

To Know More

Click here

hey guys.. i gave two tests of gprep and one of powerprep..and scored 650 in all three.. where can i xpext my actual score... sc is hurting me most........could nyone guide me

Thanks for the reply!
But there A is also explicitly stated in line 10:

However, anthropologist
(10) Shepard Krech points out that large
animal species vanished even in areas
where there is no evidence to demon-
strate that Paleoindians hunted them


Why do you think A could not be the one ?


The question is about Martin's theory, and the above mentioned text talks about Shepard Kerch's point of view.


More over he just excluded in his analysis. Does that mean, he denied it?

Martins exclusion of
climatic change as an explanation by


Lines 5 -10 explicitly state that Martin thinks Human arrival is responsible. And in his theory he excluded the climate factor completely. Therefore it is safe to deduce that his theory denies the role of climatic conditions.
  • 1 Like  

More over he just excluded in his analysis. Does that mean, he denied it?

Martin's exclusion of
climatic change as an explanation by

Thanks for the reply!
But there A is also explicitly stated in line 10:

However, anthropologist
(10) Shepard Krech points out that large
animal species vanished even in areas
where there is no evidence to demon-
strate that Paleoindians hunted them


Why do you think A could not be the one ?

Could you anyone help me solve this?

According to a theory advanced
by researcher Paul Martin, the wave
of species extinctions that occurred
Line in North America about 11,000 years
(5) ago, at the end of the Pleistocene era,
can be directly attributed to the arrival
of humans, i.e., the Paleoindians, who
were ancestors of modern Native
Americans. However, anthropologist
(10) Shepard Krech points out that large
animal species vanished even in areas
where there is no evidence to demon-
strate that Paleoindians hunted them.
Nor were extinctions confined to large
(15) animals: small animals, plants, and
insects disappeared, presumably not
all through human consumption. Krech
also contradicts Martins exclusion of
climatic change as an explanation by

(20) asserting that widespread climatic
change did indeed occur at the end of
the Pleistocene. Still, Krech attributes
secondary if not primary responsibility
for the extinctions to the Paleoindians,
(25) arguing that humans have produced
local extinctions elsewhere. But,
according to historian Richard White,
even the attribution of secondary
responsibility may not be supported
(30) by the evidence. White observes that
Martins thesis depends on coinciding
dates for the arrival of humans and the
decline of large animal species, and
Krech, though aware that the dates
(35) are controversial, does not challenge
them; yet recent archaeological
discoveries are providing evidence
that the date of human arrival was
much earlier than 11,000 years ago.


Question:
Which of the following is true about Martins theory, as that theory is described in the passage?
A. It assumes that the Paleoindians were primarily dependent on hunting for survival.
B. It denies that the Pleistocene species extinctions were caused by climate change.
C. It uses as evidence the fact that humans have produced local extinctions in other situations.
D. It attempts to address the controversy over the date of human arrival in North America.
E. It admits the possibility that factors other than the arrival of humans played a role in the Pleistocene extinctions.


IMO: B

Reason highlighted in the passage.
A is a close contender, but it is not explicitly stated in the passage. And the question clearly states..."as described in the passage"...so A is ruled out. Other choices are irrelevant.

Could you anyone help me solve this?

According to a theory advanced
by researcher Paul Martin, the wave
of species extinctions that occurred
Line in North America about 11,000 years
(5) ago, at the end of the Pleistocene era,
can be directly attributed to the arrival
of humans, i.e., the Paleoindians, who
were ancestors of modern Native
Americans. However, anthropologist
(10) Shepard Krech points out that large
animal species vanished even in areas
where there is no evidence to demon-
strate that Paleoindians hunted them.
Nor were extinctions confined to large
(15) animals: small animals, plants, and
insects disappeared, presumably not
all through human consumption. Krech
also contradicts Martins exclusion of
climatic change as an explanation by
(20) asserting that widespread climatic
change did indeed occur at the end of
the Pleistocene. Still, Krech attributes
secondary if not primary responsibility
for the extinctions to the Paleoindians,
(25) arguing that humans have produced
local extinctions elsewhere. But,
according to historian Richard White,
even the attribution of secondary
responsibility may not be supported
(30) by the evidence. White observes that
Martins thesis depends on coinciding
dates for the arrival of humans and the
decline of large animal species, and
Krech, though aware that the dates
(35) are controversial, does not challenge
them; yet recent archaeological
discoveries are providing evidence
that the date of human arrival was
much earlier than 11,000 years ago.


Question:
Which of the following is true about Martins theory, as that theory is described in the passage?
A. It assumes that the Paleoindians were primarily dependent on hunting for survival.
B. It denies that the Pleistocene species extinctions were caused by climate change.
C. It uses as evidence the fact that humans have produced local extinctions in other situations.
D. It attempts to address the controversy over the date of human arrival in North America.
E. It admits the possibility that factors other than the arrival of humans played a role in the Pleistocene extinctions.




Hey puys!!! why dis thread is left dead??? lets not forget dat RC forms an equally important part of verb as SC & CR do.. so come up wid some toughies puys.

Cheers.

wrong post
Hi pls solve the following questions


Behavior is one of two general responses available to endothermic (endothermic: adj. 吸热 ( 性 ) 的 ,[ 动 ] 温血的 ) (warm-blooded) species for the regulation of body temperature, the other being innate (reflexive) mechanisms of heat production and heat loss. Human beings rely primarily on the first to provide a hospitable thermal microclimate (microclimate: n.[ 气 ] 小气候 ( 指森林、城市、洞穴等局部地区的气候 )) for themselves, in which the transfer of heat between the body and the environment is accomplished with minimal involvement of innate mechanisms of heat production and loss. Thermoregulatory (thermoregulatory: adj. 体温调节的 , 保持 ( 一定 ) 体温的 ) behavior anticipates hyperthermia, and the organism adjusts its behavior to avoid becoming hyperthermic: it removes layers of clothing, it goes for a cool swim, etc. The organism can also respond to changes in the temperature of the body core, as is the case during exercise; but such responses result from the direct stimulation of thermoreceptors distributed widely within the central nervous system (central nervous system: n. 中枢神经系统 ) , and the ability of these mechanisms to help the organism adjust to gross changes in its environment is limited.
Until recently it was assumed that organisms respond to microwave radiation in the same way that they respond to temperature changes caused by other forms of radiation. After all, the argument runs, microwaves are radiation and heat body tissues. This theory ignores the fact that the stimulus to a behavioral response is normally a temperature change that occurs at the surface of the organism. The thermoreceptors that prompt behavioral changes are located within the first millimeter of the skins surface, but the energy of a microwave field (microwave field: 超高频场 , 微波场 ) may be selectively deposited in deep tissues, effectively bypassing these thermoreceptors, particularly if the field is at near-resonant frequencies. The resulting temperature profile (temperature profile: 温度曲线图 , 温度轮廓 ) may well be a kind of reverse thermal gradient in which the deep tissues are warmed more than those of the surface. Since the heat is not conducted outward to the surface to stimulate the appropriate receptors, the organism does not appreciate this stimulation in the same way that it appreciates heating and cooling of the skin. In theory (in theory: 理论上 ) , the internal organs of a human being or an animal could be quite literally cooked well-done (well-done: adj. 做得好的 , 完全煮熟的 ) before the animal even realizes that the balance of its thermomicroclimate has been disturbed.
Until a few years ago, microwave irradiations at equivalent plane-wave power densities of about 100 mW/cm2 were considered unequivocally to produce thermal effects; irradiations within the range of 10 to 100 mW/cm2 might or might not produce thermal effects; while effects observed at power densities below 10 mW/cm2 were assumed to be nonthermal in nature. Experiments have shown this to be an oversimplification, and a recent report suggests that fields as weak as 1 mW/cm2 can be thermogenic. When the heat generated in the tissues by an imposed radio frequency (radio frequency: n. 无线电频率 ) (plus the heat generated by metabolism) exceeds the heat-loss capabilities of the organism, the thermoregulatory system has been compromised. Yet surprisingly, not long ago (not long ago: adv. 不久前 ) , an increase in the internal body temperature was regarded merely as evidence of a thermal effect.
1. The author is primarily concerned with
(A) showing that behavior is a more effective way of controlling bodily temperature than innate mechanisms
(B) criticizing researchers who will not discard their theories about the effects of microwave radiation on organisms
(C) demonstrating that effects of microwave radiation are different from those of other forms of radiation
(D) analyzing the mechanism by which an organism maintains its bodily temperature in a changing thermal environment
(E) discussing the importance of thermoreceptors in the control of the internal temperature of an organism
2. The author makes which of the following points about innate mechanisms for heat production?
I. They are governed by thermoreceptors inside the body of the organism rather than at the surface.
II. They are a less effective means of compensating for gross changes in temperature than behavioral strategies.
III. They are not affected by microwave radiation.
(A) I only
(B) I and II only
(C) I and III only
(D) II and III only
(E) I, II, and III


6. The tone of the passage can best be described as
(A) genial and conversational
(B) alarmed and disparaging
(C) facetious and cynical
(D) scholarly and noncommittal (noncommittal: adj. 不明朗的 , 不承担义务的 )
(E) scholarly and concerned
7. The author is primarily concerned with
(A) pointing out weaknesses in a popular scientific theory
(B) developing a hypothesis to explain a scientific phenomenon
(C) reporting on new research on the effects of microwave radiation
(D) criticizing the research methods of earlier investigators
(E) clarifying ambiguities in the terminology used to describe a phenomenon


My answers..
1. A
2. B
3. A
4. B (not sure)[IMG]http://static.pagalguy.net/pagalguy/smilies/no.gif[/IMG]

OAs plz..
sdt83 Says
Hey pj02.. wat bout time??? does it allow u 2 refer d passage again n again??? hou much time u usually spend on reading d whole passage or solving d passage as a whole.. can u gimme d time split up???


Thats the problem bud...
10 mins to complete one RC for me.But i can get at least 95% correct.On a good day i can get all 100% correct.

Hey pj02.. wat bout time??? does it allow u 2 refer d passage again n again??? hou much time u usually spend on reading d whole passage or solving d passage as a whole.. can u gimme d time split up???

RC is My biggest strength.I hardly got any question wrong in the two tests that I took. And all I do is just follow these two simple things.
Only problem is time management

Basic Funda :Read the passage carefully: Carefully ... Very much carefully....I can still read a passage twice/thrice if I don't understand it completely. No speed reading... No first line/last line funda...

For every question please please please...go back to the passage and check the answer.

Dont rely on memory when solving RC. Even though the answer seems obvious to you ,go back to passage and check.
CHECK EVERY ANSWER IN PASSAGE.



Puys.. any suggestion regarding RC strategy??? i've gone thru tonnes of thread n all present a diff view..
I prefer to go thru d whole passage instead skipping d mid ones..i usually take 5min 2 go thru a passage consisting of 4 paras n about 60-65 lines, plus 1min/question or smtime less....Plz have ur says.
  • 1 Like  

Puys.. any suggestion regarding RC strategy??? i've gone thru tonnes of thread n all present a diff view..
I prefer to go thru d whole passage instead skipping d mid ones..i usually take 5min 2 go thru a passage consisting of 4 paras n about 60-65 lines, plus 1min/question or smtime less....Plz have ur says.

Follow This Discussion

When you follow a discussion, you receive notifications about new posts and comments. You can unfollow a discussion anytime, or turn off notifications for it.

289 people follow this discussion.