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Puys.. any suggestion regarding RC strategy??? i've gone thru tonnes of thread n all present a diff view..
I prefer to go thru d whole passage instead skipping d mid ones..i usually take 5min 2 go thru a passage consisting of 4 paras n about 60-65 lines, plus 1min/question or smtime less....Plz have ur says.

Hi pls solve the following questions


Behavior is one of two general responses available to endothermic (endothermic: adj. 吸热 ( 性 ) 的 ,[ 动 ] 温血的 ) (warm-blooded) species for the regulation of body temperature, the other being innate (reflexive) mechanisms of heat production and heat loss. Human beings rely primarily on the first to provide a hospitable thermal microclimate (microclimate: n.[ 气 ] 小气候 ( 指森林、城市、洞穴等局部地区的气候 )) for themselves, in which the transfer of heat between the body and the environment is accomplished with minimal involvement of innate mechanisms of heat production and loss. Thermoregulatory (thermoregulatory: adj. 体温调节的 , 保持 ( 一定 ) 体温的 ) behavior anticipates hyperthermia, and the organism adjusts its behavior to avoid becoming hyperthermic: it removes layers of clothing, it goes for a cool swim, etc. The organism can also respond to changes in the temperature of the body core, as is the case during exercise; but such responses result from the direct stimulation of thermoreceptors distributed widely within the central nervous system (central nervous system: n. 中枢神经系统 ) , and the ability of these mechanisms to help the organism adjust to gross changes in its environment is limited.
Until recently it was assumed that organisms respond to microwave radiation in the same way that they respond to temperature changes caused by other forms of radiation. After all, the argument runs, microwaves are radiation and heat body tissues. This theory ignores the fact that the stimulus to a behavioral response is normally a temperature change that occurs at the surface of the organism. The thermoreceptors that prompt behavioral changes are located within the first millimeter of the skin's surface, but the energy of a microwave field (microwave field: 超高频场 , 微波场 ) may be selectively deposited in deep tissues, effectively bypassing these thermoreceptors, particularly if the field is at near-resonant frequencies. The resulting temperature profile (temperature profile: 温度曲线图 , 温度轮廓 ) may well be a kind of reverse thermal gradient in which the deep tissues are warmed more than those of the surface. Since the heat is not conducted outward to the surface to stimulate the appropriate receptors, the organism does not "appreciate" this stimulation in the same way that it "appreciates" heating and cooling of the skin. In theory (in theory: 理论上 ) , the internal organs of a human being or an animal could be quite literally cooked well-done (well-done: adj. 做得好的 , 完全煮熟的 ) before the animal even realizes that the balance of its thermomicroclimate has been disturbed.
Until a few years ago, microwave irradiations at equivalent plane-wave power densities of about 100 mW/cm2 were considered unequivocally to produce "thermal" effects; irradiations within the range of 10 to 100 mW/cm2 might or might not produce "thermal" effects; while effects observed at power densities below 10 mW/cm2 were assumed to be "nonthermal" in nature. Experiments have shown this to be an oversimplification, and a recent report suggests that fields as weak as 1 mW/cm2 can be thermogenic. When the heat generated in the tissues by an imposed radio frequency (radio frequency: n. 无线电频率 ) (plus the heat generated by metabolism) exceeds the heat-loss capabilities of the organism, the thermoregulatory system has been compromised. Yet surprisingly, not long ago (not long ago: adv. 不久前 ) , an increase in the internal body temperature was regarded merely as "evidence" of a thermal effect.
1. The author is primarily concerned with
(A) showing that behavior is a more effective way of controlling bodily temperature than innate mechanisms
(B) criticizing researchers who will not discard their theories about the effects of microwave radiation on organisms
(C) demonstrating that effects of microwave radiation are different from those of other forms of radiation
(D) analyzing the mechanism by which an organism maintains its bodily temperature in a changing thermal environment
(E) discussing the importance of thermoreceptors in the control of the internal temperature of an organism
2. The author makes which of the following points about innate mechanisms for heat production?
I. They are governed by thermoreceptors inside the body of the organism rather than at the surface.
II. They are a less effective means of compensating for gross changes in temperature than behavioral strategies.
III. They are not affected by microwave radiation.
(A) I only
(B) I and II only
(C) I and III only
(D) II and III only
(E) I, II, and III


6. The tone of the passage can best be described as
(A) genial and conversational
(B) alarmed and disparaging
(C) facetious and cynical
(D) scholarly and noncommittal (noncommittal: adj. 不明朗的 , 不承担义务的 )
(E) scholarly and concerned
7. The author is primarily concerned with
(A) pointing out weaknesses in a popular scientific theory
(B) developing a hypothesis to explain a scientific phenomenon
(C) reporting on new research on the effects of microwave radiation
(D) criticizing the research methods of earlier investigators
(E) clarifying ambiguities in the terminology used to describe a phenomenon

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Hi Vikram,

Thanks for your reply. Really really appreciate!!
Yes the RC mistakes did happen in succession. I got 2 SCs & 4 CRs wrong but they were distributed.
One small question, say for a moment if we strike out the order of mistakes, how many Verbal mistakes(RC + SC + CR) can one afford to score say 36+ in actual GMAT?

Thanks in advance!!

-Manish



Well Well Well, I doubt...someone can really answer your this question....IF some one can then probably the algo of GMAC has been exposed!!!!

isn't it???

The crux is:
>> Make sure that, no more than 3-5 questions are wrong in Math...you are in a range of 50
>> Make sure that, no more than 6-7 questions are wrong in english, you MAY BE in 35+

combining both will yield minimum 700+

(I may be harsh though, as how %iles are changing, no one can predict)..

cheers

Hi Vikram,

Thanks for your reply. Really really appreciate!!
Yes the RC mistakes did happen in succession. I got 2 SCs & 4 CRs wrong but they were distributed.
One small question, say for a moment if we strike out the order of mistakes, how many Verbal mistakes(RC + SC + CR) can one afford to score say 36+ in actual GMAT?

Thanks in advance!!

-Manish

Hi all,

Today i wrote a princeton test. Scored 650(Q:51 V: 30). Got 7 questions wrong in RC.

Wanted to know how to interpret princeton's results?? Are the questions, especially in verbal, easier or tougher than those in actual GMAT.

Any help or relevant pointers would be highly appreciated...

- Manish


Manish,

I cant vouch for Princeton's accuracy or for that matter about the algorithm of any one of the tools out there. But, I can tell you one thing, getting 7 questions wrong on RC is NOT unheard of. And some times is not as debilitating as one might think.

A few corrections in the approach can very well boost your performance. SCs are the ones that will hurt your score much more than RCs. 3 mistakes in SC will drop your score much further than the 7 on RCs. But the most important factor is, at what juncture did you make those mistakes? Were they in succession, coupled with SCs ? etc.

Analyze your mistakes thoroughly. RCs are very easy to fix, if that is your only issue.
  • 1 Like  
Hi all,

Today i wrote a princeton test. Scored 650(Q:51 V: 30). Got 7 questions wrong in RC.

Wanted to know how to interpret princeton's results?? Are the questions, especially in verbal, easier or tougher than those in actual GMAT.

Any help or relevant pointers would be highly appreciated...

- Manish


Tougher !!

Take GPrep and you will get to know how much you gonna score in actual Test.

+- 10 marks...

Hi all,

Today i wrote a princeton test. Scored 650(Q:51 V: 30). Got 7 questions wrong in RC.

Wanted to know how to interpret princeton's results?? Are the questions, especially in verbal, easier or tougher than those in actual GMAT.

Any help or relevant pointers would be highly appreciated...

- Manish

Hi Ponds,

Good to see buddy , you are still sharpening your armoury....

Answers are:
A
B
C
E
B
C
B
C
D
I got this passage horribly wrong, don't know why???
Any specific strategy you took for this passage or in simple words, how did you go about such a passage?
Cheers

Hi Amsey,
I'll suggest you to read fast and practice from computer, specially RC, it makes lot of difference reading from system long passage and from hard copy specially in stressed environment of GMAT.Keep practicing them from system, slowly it will improve.

All the Best !
Hi Amsey,

My response is in color.
Good ones, Let me know OA's ?


Hi Ponds,

Good to see buddy , you are still sharpening your armoury....

Answers are:
A
B
C
E
B
C
B
C
D

I got this passage horribly wrong, don't know why???

Any specific strategy you took for this passage or in simple words, how did you go about such a passage?

Cheers

Woodrow Wilson was referring to the liberal
idea of the economic market when he said that
the free enterprise system is the most efficient
economic system. Maximum freedom means
(5)maximum productiveness; our "openness" is to
be the measure of our stability. Fascination with
this ideal has made Americans defy the "Old
World" categories of settled possessiveness versus
unsettling deprivation, the cupidity of retention
(10)versus the cupidity of seizure, a "status quo"
defended or attacked. The United States, it was
believed, had no status quo ante. Our only "sta-
tion" was the turning of a stationary wheel, spin-
ning faster and faster. We did not base our
(15) system on property but opportunity---which
meant we based it not on stability but on mobil-
ity. The more things changed, that is, the more
rapidly the wheel turned, the steadier we would
be. The conventional picture of class politics is
(20) composed of the Haves, who want a stability to
keep what they have, and the Have-Nots, who
want a touch of instability and change in which
to scramble for the things they have not. But
Americans imagined a condition in which spec-
(25)ulators, self-makers, runners are always using the
new opportunities given by our land. These eco-
nomic leaders (front-runners) would thus he
mainly agents of change. The nonstarters were
considered the ones who wanted stability, a
(30)strong referee to give them some position in the
race, a regulative hand to calm manic specula-
tion; an authority that can call things to a halt,
begin things again from compensatorily stag-
gered "starting lines."
(35) "Reform" in America has been sterile because
it can imagine no change except through the
extension of this metaphor of a race, wider inclu-
sion of competitors, "a piece of the action," as it
were, for the disenfranchised. There is no
(40)attempt to call off the race. Since our only sta-
bility is change, America seems not to honor the
quiet work that achieves social interdependence
and stability. There is, in our legends, no hero-
ism of the office clerk, no stable industrial work
(45) force of the people who actually make the system
work. There is no pride in being an employee
(Wilson asked for a return to the time when
everyone was an employer). There has been no
boasting about our social workers---they are
(50)merely signs of the system's failure, of opportu-
nity denied or not taken, of things to be elimi-
nated. We have no pride in our growing
interdependence, in the fact that our system can
serve others, that we are able to help those in
(55) need; empty boasts from the past make us
ashamed of our present achievements, make us
try to forget or deny them, move away from
them. There is no honor but in the Wonderland
race we must all run, all trying to win, none
(60)winning in the end (for there is no end).
1. The primary purpose of the passage is to
(A) criticize the inflexibility of American economic
mythology
(B) contrast "Old World" and "New World" economic
ideologies
(C) challenge the integrity of traditional political
leaders

(D) champion those Americans whom the author
deems to be neglected
(E) suggest a substitute for the traditional metaphor
of a race
2. According to the passage, "Old World" values were
based on
(A) ability
(B) property
(C) family connections
(D) guild hierarchies
(E) education
3. In the context of the author's discussion of
regulating change, which of the following could be
most probably regarded as a "strong referee" (line
30) in the United States?
(A) A school principal
(B) A political theorist
(C) A federal court judge
(D) A social worker
(E) A government inspector
4. The author sets off the word "Reform" (line 35) with
quotation marks in order to
(A) emphasize its departure from the concept of
settled possessiveness
(B) show his support for a systematic program of
change
(C) underscore the flexibility and even amorphousness
of United States society.
(D) indicate that the term was one of Wilson's favorites
(E) assert that reform in the United States has not
been fundamental

5. It can be inferred from the passage that the author
most probably thinks that giving the disenfranchised
"a piece of the action " (line 3 is
(A) a compassionate, if misdirected, legislative
measure
(B) an example of Americans' resistance to profound
social change

(C) an innovative program for genuine social reform
(D) a monument to the efforts of industrial reformers
(E) a surprisingly "Old World" remedy for social ills
6. Which of the following metaphors could the author
most appropriately use to summarize his own
assessment of the American economic system
(lines 35-60)?
(A) A windmill
(B) A waterfall
(C) A treadmill
(D) A gyroscope
(E) A bellows
7. It can be inferred from the passage that Woodrow
Wilson's ideas about the economic market
(A) encouraged those who "make the system work"
(lines 45-46)
(B) perpetuated traditional legends about America
(C) revealed the prejudices of a man born wealthy
(D) foreshadowed the stock market crash of 1929
(E) began a tradition of presidential proclamations on
economics
8. The passage contains information that would answer
which of the following questions?
.What techniques have industrialists used to
manipulate a free market?
.In what ways are " New World" and " Old World"
economic policies similar?
. Has economic policy in the United States tended
to reward independent action?
(A) only
(B) only
(C) only
(D) and only
(E) and only
9. Which of the following best expresses the author's
main point?
(A) Americans' pride in their jobs continues to give
them stamina today.
(B) The absence of a status quo ante has
undermined United States economic structure.
(C) The free enterprise system has been only a
useless concept in the United States
(D) The myth of the American free enterprise system
is seriously flawed.

(E) Fascination with the ideal of "openness" has

made Americans a progressive people.

have fun...............


Hi Amsey,

My response is in color.
Good ones, Let me know OA's ?
  • 1 Like  


Woodrow Wilson was referring to the liberal
idea of the economic market when he said that
the free enterprise system is the most efficient
economic system. Maximum freedom means
(5)maximum productiveness; our "openness" is to
be the measure of our stability. Fascination with
this ideal has made Americans defy the "Old
World" categories of settled possessiveness versus
unsettling deprivation, the cupidity of retention
(10)versus the cupidity of seizure, a "status quo"
defended or attacked. The United States, it was
believed, had no status quo ante. Our only "sta-
tion" was the turning of a stationary wheel, spin-
ning faster and faster. We did not base our
(15) system on property but opportunity---which
meant we based it not on stability but on mobil-
ity. The more things changed, that is, the more
rapidly the wheel turned, the steadier we would
be. The conventional picture of class politics is
(20) composed of the Haves, who want a stability to
keep what they have, and the Have-Nots, who
want a touch of instability and change in which
to scramble for the things they have not. But
Americans imagined a condition in which spec-
(25)ulators, self-makers, runners are always using the
new opportunities given by our land. These eco-
nomic leaders (front-runners) would thus he
mainly agents of change. The nonstarters were
considered the ones who wanted stability, a
(30)strong referee to give them some position in the
race, a regulative hand to calm manic specula-
tion; an authority that can call things to a halt,
begin things again from compensatorily stag-
gered "starting lines."
(35) "Reform" in America has been sterile because
it can imagine no change except through the
extension of this metaphor of a race, wider inclu-
sion of competitors, "a piece of the action," as it
were, for the disenfranchised. There is no
(40)attempt to call off the race. Since our only sta-
bility is change, America seems not to honor the
quiet work that achieves social interdependence
and stability. There is, in our legends, no hero-
ism of the office clerk, no stable industrial work
(45) force of the people who actually make the system
work. There is no pride in being an employee
(Wilson asked for a return to the time when
everyone was an employer). There has been no
boasting about our social workers---they are
(50)merely signs of the system's failure, of opportu-
nity denied or not taken, of things to be elimi-
nated. We have no pride in our growing
interdependence, in the fact that our system can
serve others, that we are able to help those in
(55) need; empty boasts from the past make us
ashamed of our present achievements, make us
try to forget or deny them, move away from
them. There is no honor but in the Wonderland
race we must all run, all trying to win, none
(60)winning in the end (for there is no end).
1. The primary purpose of the passage is to
(A) criticize the inflexibility of American economic
mythology
(B) contrast "Old World" and "New World" economic
ideologies
(C) challenge the integrity of traditional political
leaders
(D) champion those Americans whom the author
deems to be neglected
(E) suggest a substitute for the traditional metaphor
of a race
2. According to the passage, "Old World" values were
based on
(A) ability
(B) property
(C) family connections
(D) guild hierarchies
(E) education
3. In the context of the author's discussion of
regulating change, which of the following could be
most probably regarded as a "strong referee" (line
30) in the United States?
(A) A school principal
(B) A political theorist
(C) A federal court judge
(D) A social worker
(E) A government inspector
4. The author sets off the word "Reform" (line 35) with
quotation marks in order to
(A) emphasize its departure from the concept of
settled possessiveness
(B) show his support for a systematic program of
change
(C) underscore the flexibility and even amorphousness
of United States society.
(D) indicate that the term was one of Wilson's favorites
(E) assert that reform in the United States has not
been fundamental
5. It can be inferred from the passage that the author
most probably thinks that giving the disenfranchised
"a piece of the action " (line 3 is
(A) a compassionate, if misdirected, legislative
measure
(B) an example of Americans' resistance to profound
social change
(C) an innovative program for genuine social reform
(D) a monument to the efforts of industrial reformers
(E) a surprisingly "Old World" remedy for social ills
6. Which of the following metaphors could the author
most appropriately use to summarize his own
assessment of the American economic system
(lines 35-60)?
(A) A windmill
(B) A waterfall
(C) A treadmill
(D) A gyroscope
(E) A bellows
7. It can be inferred from the passage that Woodrow
Wilson's ideas about the economic market
(A) encouraged those who "make the system work"
(lines 45-46)
(B) perpetuated traditional legends about America
(C) revealed the prejudices of a man born wealthy
(D) foreshadowed the stock market crash of 1929
(E) began a tradition of presidential proclamations on
economics
8. The passage contains information that would answer
which of the following questions?
.What techniques have industrialists used to
manipulate a free market?
.In what ways are " New World" and " Old World"
economic policies similar?
. Has economic policy in the United States tended
to reward independent action?
(A) only
(B) only
(C) only
(D) and only
(E) and only
9. Which of the following best expresses the author's
main point?
(A) Americans' pride in their jobs continues to give
them stamina today.
(B) The absence of a status quo ante has
undermined United States economic structure.
(C) The free enterprise system has been only a
useless concept in the United States
(D) The myth of the American free enterprise system
is seriously flawed.
(E) Fascination with the ideal of "openness" has
made Americans a progressive people.
have fun...............
Here is my take on the above RC
1. B
2. D
3. A
4. C


Hi Puys,

OA is 1., 2.E, 3.A, 4..


Cheers !
:cheerio:
  • 1 Like  

Here is my take on the above RC
1. B
2. D
3. A
4. C

Puys Help Me
The basic theory of plate tectonics recognizes two ways continental margins can grow seaward. Where two plates move away from a midocean rift that separates them, thecontinental margins on those plates are said to be passive. Such continental margins grow slowly from the accumulation of riverborne sediments and of the carbonate skeletons of marine organisms. Since most sequences ofsuch accretions, or miogeoclinal deposits, are undeformed, passive margins are not associated with mountain building.
Along active margins continents tend to grow much faster. At an active margin anoceanic plate plunges under a continental plate, fragments of which then adhere to the continental margin. The process is met with extensive volcanism and mountain-building. A classic example is the Andes of the west coastof South America.
In the original plate-tectonic model western North America was described as being initially passive and then active. It was assumed that the continent grew to a limited extent along thismargin as oceanic rocks accreted in places such as the Coast Ranges of California. The model was successful in explaining such disparate features as the Franciscan rocks of the California Coast Ranges, created by subduction, and the granite rocks of the Sierra Nevada that originated in volcanoes.
The basic plate-tectonic reconstruction of the geologic history of western North America remains unchanged in the light of microplatetectonics, but the details are radically changed. It is now clear that much more crust was added to North America in the Mesozoic era than can be accounted for by volcanism and by the simple accretion of sediments. Further, someadjacent terranes are not genetically related, as would be expected from simple plate tectonics, but have almost certainly traveled great distances from entirely different parts of the world.

1. Which one of the following best expresses the main idea of the passage?

(A)The margin of the west coast of North America developed through a combination of active and passive mechanisms.
(B)The growth of continental margins is only partially explained by the basic theory of plate tectonics.
(C)Continental margins can grow seaward in two ways, through sedimentation or volcanism.
(D)The introduction of microplate tectonics poses a fundamental challenge to the existing theory of how continental margins are formed.
(E)Continental margins grow more rapidly along active margins than along passive margins.

2. The passage supplies information for answering all of the following questions regarding continental margins EXCEPT:

(A)How have marine organisms contributed to the formation of passive continental margins?
(B)What were some of the processes by which the continental margin of the west coast of North America was formed?
(C)Are miogeoclinal deposits associated with mountain building along continental margins?
(D)How was the continental margin of the west coast of South America formed?
(E)How much crust added to North America in the Mesozoic era can be accounted for by the accretion of sediments from the ocean floor?

3. The author mentions the Franciscan rocks of the California Coast Ranges in order to make which one of the following points?

(A)The basic theory of plate tectonics accounts for a wide variety of geologic features.
(B)The original plate tectonic model falls short of explaining such features.
(C)Subduction processes are responsible for the majority of the geologic features found along the west coast of North America.
(D)Passive margins can take on many geologic forms.
(E)The concept of microplate tectonics was first introduced to account for such phenomena.

4. Which one of the following does the author mention as evidence for the inadequacy of the original plate tectonic model to describe the formation of continental margins?

(A)Nearly flat, undeformed crystal blocks have been found along some continental margins where there are mountains further inland.
(B)Sediments and fragments from the depths of the ocean accumulate along continental margins.
(C) Large pieces of the Earth's crust that appear to be completely unrelated are found in the same area today.
(D) Undeformed miogeoclinal deposits are usually not linked to mountain building
(E)Oceanic plates drop beneath continental plates along active margins.

:grin:

OA for the RC "How many really suffer as a result of labor market problems? This .........."

1. E
2. D
3. B
4. C
5. B
6. A
7. E
8. D
9. A

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