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@baku

baku
@baku 8
Posted 15 Feb '12
> cat_the_bell Says > > Hello Guys, > Thanks for your inputs. Just a little confusion here. According to my R & D, I have come up with this comprehensive list. Please let me know if this is an exhaustive one. 1) GMAT OG 12th Edition (I was not aware of OG Verbal and OG Quants) 2) The Pri...
cat_the_bell Says
Hello Guys,

Thanks for your inputs. Just a little confusion here. According to my R & D, I have come up with this comprehensive list. Please let me know if this is an exhaustive one.
1) GMAT OG 12th Edition (I was not aware of OG Verbal and OG Quants)
2) The Princeton Review
3) Manhattan SC Guide
4) SC/CR 1000 or SC Grail (only available online)
5) RC99 by Aristotle Prep (only available online)
6) Powerscore CR Bible by David M Killoran
Now am a lil confused . Is it also necessary to purchase the OG Quants and Verbal as well, or just OG would suffice? Is it also necessary to go for The Princeton Review along with OG Quants and Verbal? Or either of OG Quants & Verbal / The Princeton Review would do?
Also, how about 3,4,5 and 6? Can someone please give a comprehensive list of books and also is there any particular sequence to be followed for best results?
Thanks!!!

1000 series and RC99 are not trusted document.
For 1000 sc most of the question are bad and in most the OA given is wrong while other test some different aspect not tested on GMAT. Let me give you some example :

--

Wrong concept tested : refer 238 of 1000 SC -- answer is given E.
Well according to GMAT both A and E is fine( but E is better than A in conventional English but not in GMAT world) --as till date there is no problems where "it" can refer to a proceeding noun clause. Its well accepted in conventional English - but not in GMAT ( as there are none in OG)
--

Wrong OA -- problem no. 2 -- the correct answer is D but according to 1000 sc its A
--

Some problem in 1000 series where Scoretop has directly copied from LSAT and GMAC OG are good. But not all
--

RC 99 -- Most of the RC passage in RC 99 are copied from kaplan MCAT book while others are not at all GMAT type passages. Please refer this link :

http://www.aristotleprep.com/forums/feedbacksuggestions/response-needed
--

For Verbal, stick to OG, Manhattan,Kaplan and Powerscore.



Happy studying.


baku
@baku 8
Posted 03 Feb '12
> Hi guys, . But in SC (Sentence correction), I have no clue what to do.....HELP.....!!!!! Here are some posts and article written by the Great Ron. You may find it helpful. CONFUSED .. How to proceed further 550 to 720 in 5 weeks ? Experts pls. Help !! Strategies for Improv...
Hi guys,

. But in SC (Sentence correction), I have no clue what to do.....HELP.....!!!!!


Here are some posts and article written by the Great Ron. You may find it helpful.

CONFUSED .. How to proceed further
550 to 720 in 5 weeks ? Experts pls. Help !!
Strategies for Improving Sentence Correction Skills GMAT Verbal Articles Manhattan GMAT Prep
baku
@baku 8
Posted 27 Jan '12
> Both A and B (which are the only potentially correct answer choices) have common structure: requires + THAT + academic prerequisites + Command Subjunctive(be). That being the case, as the original poster suggests, only A qualifies, because choice B is not subjunctive. The "second" cas...
Both A and B (which are the only potentially correct answer choices) have common structure: requires + THAT + academic prerequisites + Command Subjunctive(be).

That being the case, as the original poster suggests, only A qualifies, because choice B is not subjunctive.

The "second" case of command subjunctive that you suggest (Bossy verb + object +to+ command sujunctive) is not applicable to either A or B. So, I am not completely sure what you are disagreeing with. Are you suggesting that choice A is not command subjunctive? If you can explain a bit more, we can take the discussion forward.

p.s. By the way, I doubt whether this "second" case of command subjunctive that you suggest, would ever be correct on GMAT. But as it is anyway not getting tested here, let us leave that discussion for some other time.

-------------------------------------------
Thanks,
Ashish
GMAT Faculty @ EducationAisle
GMAT - 99th Percentile, MBA - ISB



What I disagree here, is the only one structure of command subjunctive taken into consideration for the verb - "require", the same applies for other verb as "ask"
According to kaplan explanation in kaplan Live premiere SC #15 - they identified both the potential form of command subjunctive for the verb "ask" - in their explanation. Actually both the structures are only applicable for few - ask, requires( as in this),urge...

So while explanation goes I think - taking only one structure into consideration - "that" - is not right. That is all.

If the same sentence is written as :

A certain school's admissions policy requires both undergraduate and graduate schools ---- then here "that" cannot be used !! so considering both the structure is important - just my personal view.

I am sorry if I have used very strong words as " completely disagree".
baku
@baku 8
Posted 27 Jan '12
> Both A and B (which are the only potentially correct answer choices) have common structure: requires + THAT + academic prerequisites + Command Subjunctive(be). That being the case, as the original poster suggests, only A qualifies, because choice B is not subjunctive. The "second" cas...
Both A and B (which are the only potentially correct answer choices) have common structure: requires + THAT + academic prerequisites + Command Subjunctive(be).

That being the case, as the original poster suggests, only A qualifies, because choice B is not subjunctive.

The "second" case of command subjunctive that you suggest (Bossy verb + object +to+ command sujunctive) is not applicable to either A or B. So, I am not completely sure what you are disagreeing with. Are you suggesting that choice A is not command subjunctive? If you can explain a bit more, we can take the discussion forward.

p.s. By the way, I doubt whether this "second" case of command subjunctive that you suggest, would ever be correct on GMAT. But as it is anyway not getting tested here, let us leave that discussion for some other time.

-------------------------------------------
Thanks,
Ashish
GMAT Faculty @ EducationAisle
GMAT - 99th Percentile, MBA - ISB



What I disagree here, is the only one structure of command subjunctive taken into consideration for the verb - "require", the same applies for other verb as "ask"
According to kaplan explanation in kaplan Live premiere SC #15 - they identified both the potential form of command subjunctive for the verb "ask" - in their explanation. Actually both the structures are only applicable for few - ask, requires( as in this),urge...

So while explanation goes I think - taking only one structure into consideration - "that" - is not right. That is all.

If the same sentence is written as :

A certain school's admissions policy requires both undergraduate and graduate schools ---- then here "that" cannot be used !! so considering both the structure is important - just my personal view.

I am sorry if I have used very strong words as " completely disagree".
baku
@baku 8
Posted 27 Jan '12
> A certain school's admissions policy requires of both undergraduate and graduate schools that *academic prerequisites be the same *for programs historically entered by male students *as for programs* requiring equivalent academic rigor that are usually entered by female students. A. that ...
A certain school's admissions policy requires of both undergraduate and graduate schools that academic prerequisites be the same for programs historically entered by male students as for programs requiring equivalent academic rigor that are usually entered by female students.

A. that academic prerequisites be the same for programs historically entered by male students as for programs requiring equivalent academic rigor that are
B. that academic prerequisites for programs historically entered by male students should be the same as for a program requiring equivalent academic rigor
C. to demand academic prerequisites the same in programs historically entered by male students as in programs of equivalent academic rigor that are
D. to demand academic prerequisites the same apart from whether a program was historically entered by male students or is one demanding equivalent academic rigor
E. to demand academic prerequisites as much for programs historically entered by men as for a program demanding equivalent academic rigor

Without much ado, strike out options C, D and E - reason; the sentence is in "Command Subjunctive" form, which follows - requires + THAT + academic prerequisites + Command Subjunctive(be)

So option A and B, in option B "should" is not used in command subjunctive form.

(Above two are grammatical rules of American English!)

Regarding "those for", what is it meant by "those" in "those for"? Academic Programs,

Let X be academic prerequisite

X be the same for (Type-A) programs as for (Type-B) programs

Idiom - the same X as Y where X and Y are to be parallel - are they above? Yes

Another way, what are we comparing here in the same as idiom - programs and not academic prerequisites if we were comparing academic prerequisites we would be putting "academic prerequisites" after the same

the same X for (Type-A) programs as those(refer another version of X) for (Type-B) programs - idiomatic parallelism is maintained but sentence would not make sense (check it out by putting above in question sentence, ask yourself "what should be the same according to policy?"

P.S.

Please click "thanks" for all of my answers, friend, plzzzzz



i will completely disagree with this explanation : This are the two structures of command subjunctive :

bossy veb + that + subject + command subjunctive

I require that he be here.

you can turn the subject into the object of a the verb

Bossy verb + object +to+ command sujunctive.

I require him to be here. - "to be here" is an object complement

Both the above structure are correct.

In this sentence : requires of X - of X is not a object , its an adverb modifying the verb the verb "require" -- so "that" is apt. So A is correct as per the above templates
baku
@baku 8
Posted 27 Jan '12
> Hi, It might sound a bit basic but please can anyone clarify the differences between, Lower. Less. Little. Fewer in terms of countable/ uncountable, in which case to use them, etc. Any quick help will be much appreciated... Thanks a lot. :) less/littl...
Hi,

It might sound a bit basic but please can anyone clarify the differences between,

Lower.
Less.
Little.
Fewer

in terms of countable/ uncountable, in which case to use them, etc. Any quick help will be much appreciated...

Thanks a lot.
:)





less/little : it can act as an adjective,adverb and as a noun
lower/fewer : always act as an adjective

Apply this in this problem :

Even though the direct costs of malpractice disputes amounts to a sum lower than one percent of the $541 billion the nation spent on health care last year, doctors say fear of lawsuits plays major role in health-care inflation.

(A) amounts to a sum lower
(B) amounts to less
(C) amounted to less
(D) amounted to lower
(E) amounted to a lower sum

C is the right one : as less is a noun here - an object of a preposition.

Hope this helps !!
baku
@baku 8
Posted 27 Jan '12
> Hi, It might sound a bit basic but please can anyone clarify the differences between, Lower. Less. Little. Fewer in terms of countable/ uncountable, in which case to use them, etc. Any quick help will be much appreciated... Thanks a lot. :) less/little :...
Hi,

It might sound a bit basic but please can anyone clarify the differences between,

Lower.
Less.
Little.
Fewer

in terms of countable/ uncountable, in which case to use them, etc. Any quick help will be much appreciated...

Thanks a lot.
:)




less/little : it can act as an adjective,adverb and as a noun
lower/fewer : always act as an adjective

Apply this in this problem :

Even though the direct costs of malpractice disputes amounts to a sum lower than one percent of the $541 billion the nation spent on health care last year, doctors say fear of lawsuits plays major role in health-care inflation.

(A) amounts to a sum lower
(B) amounts to less
(C) amounted to less
(D) amounted to lower
(E) amounted to a lower sum

C is the right one : as less is a noun here - an object of a preposition.

Hope this helps !!
baku
@baku 8
Posted 27 Jan '12
> Hi, It might sound a bit basic but please can anyone clarify the differences between, Lower. Less. Little. Fewer in terms of countable/ uncountable, in which case to use them, etc. Any quick help will be much appreciated... Thanks a lot. :) less/little :...
Hi,

It might sound a bit basic but please can anyone clarify the differences between,

Lower.
Less.
Little.
Fewer

in terms of countable/ uncountable, in which case to use them, etc. Any quick help will be much appreciated...

Thanks a lot.
:)




less/little : it can act as an adjective,adverb and as a noun
lower/fewer : always act as an adjective

Apply this in this problem :

Even though the direct costs of malpractice disputes amounts to a sum lower than one percent of the $541 billion the nation spent on health care last year, doctors say fear of lawsuits plays major role in health-care inflation.

(A) amounts to a sum lower
(B) amounts to less
(C) amounted to less
(D) amounted to lower
(E) amounted to a lower sum

C is the right one : as less is a noun here - an object of a preposition.

Hope this helps !!
baku
@baku 8
Posted 27 Jan '12
> Hi, It might sound a bit basic but please can anyone clarify the differences between, Lower. Less. Little. Fewer in terms of countable/ uncountable, in which case to use them, etc. Any quick help will be much appreciated... Thanks a lot. :) less/little :...
Hi,

It might sound a bit basic but please can anyone clarify the differences between,

Lower.
Less.
Little.
Fewer

in terms of countable/ uncountable, in which case to use them, etc. Any quick help will be much appreciated...

Thanks a lot.
:)




less/little : it can act as an adjective,adverb and as a noun
lower/fewer : always act as an adjective

Apply this in this problem :

Even though the direct costs of malpractice disputes amounts to a sum lower than one percent of the $541 billion the nation spent on health care last year, doctors say fear of lawsuits plays major role in health-care inflation.

(A) amounts to a sum lower
(B) amounts to less
(C) amounted to less
(D) amounted to lower
(E) amounted to a lower sum

C is the right one : as less is a noun here - an object of a preposition.

Hope this helps !!
baku
@baku 8
Posted 27 Jan '12
> Hi, It might sound a bit basic but please can anyone clarify the differences between, Lower. Less. Little. Fewer in terms of countable/ uncountable, in which case to use them, etc. Any quick help will be much appreciated... Thanks a lot. :) less/little : it...
Hi,

It might sound a bit basic but please can anyone clarify the differences between,

Lower.
Less.
Little.
Fewer

in terms of countable/ uncountable, in which case to use them, etc. Any quick help will be much appreciated...

Thanks a lot.
:)



less/little : it can act as an adjective,adverb and as a noun
lower/fewer : always act as an adjective

Apply this in this problem :

Even though the direct costs of malpractice disputes amounts to a sum lower than one percent of the $541 billion the nation spent on health care last year, doctors say fear of lawsuits plays major role in health-care inflation.

(A) amounts to a sum lower
(B) amounts to less
(C) amounted to less
(D) amounted to lower
(E) amounted to a lower sum

C is the right one : as less is a noun here - an object of a preposition.

Hope this helps !!